A Culture of Human Rights: Transforming Policing in Northern Ireland

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/92941
Title:
A Culture of Human Rights: Transforming Policing in Northern Ireland
Authors:
Lamb, Michele
Abstract:
The reform of policing in Northern Ireland has been underpinned by a commitment to the mainstreaming of human rights and compliance with international human rights standards that has been welcomed by human rights advocates. This article considers three ways in which human rights ideas are challenging the conduct and traditions of policing in Northern Ireland in order to promote a new police force based on a human rights culture: first, through seeking to transform the enduring symbols of the former Royal Ulster Constabulary and their reproduction in policing practices and the cultural environment; secondly, through their role in providing new ‘cultural capacities’ based on human rights ideas of respect, equality, toleration, dignity, fairness, transparency, and democratic accountability from which police officers can draw in carrying out their functions; and thirdly in confronting and seeking to diffuse the professional and cultural boundaries between police, human rights advocates and lay people.
Publisher:
Oxford Journals
Journal:
Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/92941
DOI:
doi:10.1093/police/pan039
Additional Links:
http://policing.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/2/3/386
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Department of Social Sciences Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLamb, Micheleen
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-24T14:17:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-24T14:17:05Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.doidoi:10.1093/police/pan039-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/92941-
dc.description.abstractThe reform of policing in Northern Ireland has been underpinned by a commitment to the mainstreaming of human rights and compliance with international human rights standards that has been welcomed by human rights advocates. This article considers three ways in which human rights ideas are challenging the conduct and traditions of policing in Northern Ireland in order to promote a new police force based on a human rights culture: first, through seeking to transform the enduring symbols of the former Royal Ulster Constabulary and their reproduction in policing practices and the cultural environment; secondly, through their role in providing new ‘cultural capacities’ based on human rights ideas of respect, equality, toleration, dignity, fairness, transparency, and democratic accountability from which police officers can draw in carrying out their functions; and thirdly in confronting and seeking to diffuse the professional and cultural boundaries between police, human rights advocates and lay people.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Michele Lamb (michele.lamb@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-02-24T13:54:00Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Min Allen(min.allen@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-02-24T14:17:05Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-02-24T14:17:05Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2008en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford Journalsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://policing.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/2/3/386en
dc.subjectNorthern Irelanden
dc.subjectpolicingen
dc.subjecthuman rightsen
dc.titleA Culture of Human Rights: Transforming Policing in Northern Irelanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPolicing: A Journal of Policy and Practiceen
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