The social construction of forced marriage and its 'victim' in media coverage and crime policy

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/92274
Title:
The social construction of forced marriage and its 'victim' in media coverage and crime policy
Authors:
Gill, Aisha; Anitha, Sundari
Abstract:
This theoretical chapter has a threefold purpose. The first objective is to unpack the definitional distinction between coercion and consent in a marriage that has been employed in the legal and policy discourses on forced marriage in the UK. Building on this analysis, the second and third objectives are to uncover how existing conceptualizations of coercion shape the discourse on forced and arranged marriage and practical and policy approaches to this problem in the UK, and to examine the implications of such a conceptualization of coercion for the theory and practice of justice between the genders. We also seek to locate the recent hypervisibility of certain forms of violence against minority ethnic women in media and policy discourses in the UK/Europe and increasingly Canada– e.g. forced marriage and so-called ‘honour-based crimes’ – in the context of shifting debates on multiculturalism, community cohesion, identity and citizenship, whereby violence against BME women is treated as particularly problematic because it is seen as a marker of the ‘difference’ of these communities. We conclude the chapter by suggesting measures and policy recommendations for tackling the problem in a more unified, holistic way, one which addresses the complexity of the debate on FM by focusing on the rights and conditions of women victims.
Issue Date:
Jan-2011
URI:
http://zedbooks.co.uk/hardback/forced-marriage
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781848134621
Appears in Collections:
Department of Social Sciences Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGill, Aishaen
dc.contributor.authorAnitha, Sundari-
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-16T12:37:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-16T12:37:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-01-
dc.identifier.isbn9781848134621-
dc.identifier.urihttp://zedbooks.co.uk/hardback/forced-marriage-
dc.description.abstractThis theoretical chapter has a threefold purpose. The first objective is to unpack the definitional distinction between coercion and consent in a marriage that has been employed in the legal and policy discourses on forced marriage in the UK. Building on this analysis, the second and third objectives are to uncover how existing conceptualizations of coercion shape the discourse on forced and arranged marriage and practical and policy approaches to this problem in the UK, and to examine the implications of such a conceptualization of coercion for the theory and practice of justice between the genders. We also seek to locate the recent hypervisibility of certain forms of violence against minority ethnic women in media and policy discourses in the UK/Europe and increasingly Canada– e.g. forced marriage and so-called ‘honour-based crimes’ – in the context of shifting debates on multiculturalism, community cohesion, identity and citizenship, whereby violence against BME women is treated as particularly problematic because it is seen as a marker of the ‘difference’ of these communities. We conclude the chapter by suggesting measures and policy recommendations for tackling the problem in a more unified, holistic way, one which addresses the complexity of the debate on FM by focusing on the rights and conditions of women victims.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Aisha Gill (a.gill@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-02-15T17:25:13Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-02-16T12:37:26Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-02-16T12:37:27Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2011-01en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleThe social construction of forced marriage and its 'victim' in media coverage and crime policyen
dc.typeBook chapteren
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