Explaining daughter devaluation and the issue of missing women in South Asia and the UK

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/92201
Title:
Explaining daughter devaluation and the issue of missing women in South Asia and the UK
Authors:
Gill, Aisha; Mitra-Kahn, Trishima
Abstract:
Women in South Asia have a biologically abnormal chance of mortality from conception until their mid-thirties. This phenomenon (known as ‘missing women’) is related to son preference and daughter devaluation, which manifests itself in sex-selective abortions and gender-biased allocations of healthcare and nutrition. This article examines putative underlying determinants of the missing women phenomenon in South Asia (primarily India, but touching upon Pakistan and Bangladesh) and determines which of them are operative. It is found that these underlying determinants persist in migrant communities in the UK, though there is evidence that they find expression in different ways. The article presents an agenda for researching the phenomenon of missing women in the UK and suggests ways in which it might be eliminated.
Publisher:
Sage
Journal:
Current Sociology
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0011392109337652
DOI:
10.1177/0011392109337652
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Department of Social Sciences Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGill, Aishaen
dc.contributor.authorMitra-Kahn, Trishima-
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-15T16:59:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-15T16:59:17Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0011392109337652-
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0011392109337652-
dc.description.abstractWomen in South Asia have a biologically abnormal chance of mortality from conception until their mid-thirties. This phenomenon (known as ‘missing women’) is related to son preference and daughter devaluation, which manifests itself in sex-selective abortions and gender-biased allocations of healthcare and nutrition. This article examines putative underlying determinants of the missing women phenomenon in South Asia (primarily India, but touching upon Pakistan and Bangladesh) and determines which of them are operative. It is found that these underlying determinants persist in migrant communities in the UK, though there is evidence that they find expression in different ways. The article presents an agenda for researching the phenomenon of missing women in the UK and suggests ways in which it might be eliminated.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Aisha Gill (a.gill@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-02-15T16:53:34Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-02-15T16:59:17Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-02-15T16:59:17Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2009en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.subjectdaughter devaluationen
dc.subjectmigration-
dc.subjectmissing women-
dc.subjectsex-selective abortion-
dc.subjectson preference-
dc.titleExplaining daughter devaluation and the issue of missing women in South Asia and the UKen
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Sociologyen
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