Empowerment through activism: responding to domestic violence in the South Asian community

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/92189
Title:
Empowerment through activism: responding to domestic violence in the South Asian community
Authors:
Gill, Aisha; Rehman, Gulshun
Abstract:
This article focuses on South Asian women's activism, and its impact on diversity and social development in South Asian communities in east London. It discusses the experience of the Newham Asian Women's Project (NAWP), which is committed to secure social justice for women and children escaping domestic violence. The article examines the tensions between the global phenomenon of violence against women and women's specific experiences of violence in different cultural settings. There is a parallel tension between universal responses to violence as a human-rights violation, and more culturally situated approaches. The article emphasises the ways in which NAWP's work addresses gender, race, and class-based inequality, using participatory approaches to empower women and direct the strategy of the organisation. For South Asian women in Newham, activism emerges out of their everyday resistances to oppression, which are based on ideas of community and family.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Gender and Development
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13552070410001726546
DOI:
10.1080/13552070410001726546
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Department of Social Sciences Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGill, Aishaen
dc.contributor.authorRehman, Gulshun-
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-15T20:32:04Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-15T20:32:04Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13552070410001726546-
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13552070410001726546-
dc.description.abstractThis article focuses on South Asian women's activism, and its impact on diversity and social development in South Asian communities in east London. It discusses the experience of the Newham Asian Women's Project (NAWP), which is committed to secure social justice for women and children escaping domestic violence. The article examines the tensions between the global phenomenon of violence against women and women's specific experiences of violence in different cultural settings. There is a parallel tension between universal responses to violence as a human-rights violation, and more culturally situated approaches. The article emphasises the ways in which NAWP's work addresses gender, race, and class-based inequality, using participatory approaches to empower women and direct the strategy of the organisation. For South Asian women in Newham, activism emerges out of their everyday resistances to oppression, which are based on ideas of community and family.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Aisha Gill (a.gill@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-02-15T17:18:15Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-02-15T20:32:03Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-02-15T20:32:04Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2004en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.titleEmpowerment through activism: responding to domestic violence in the South Asian communityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalGender and Developmenten
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