Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/92187
Title:
Patriarchal violence in the name of ‘honour’
Authors:
Gill, Aisha
Abstract:
This article explains how notions or honour can act as catalysts for so-called honour-based violence when ideas of family and community are challenged by women, and highlights a number of recent and high-profile examples of honour crimes in the UK. A key question is how these crimes should be regarded in the context of our increasingly multi-cultural society. The article examines the way in which the British media have reported these crimes has misrepresented ethnic minorities and engendered a sense of mainstream moral superiority. Furthermore, it argues that a better understanding of the relationship between culture and morality could lead to a more nuanced approach to the construction of a human rights framework. But we must guard against two dangers: on the one hand the danger of universalising what are merely western feminist ideas of morality, and on the other of tolerating human rights violations for the sake of multi-cultural accommodation.
Publisher:
International Journal of Criminal Justice Sciences
Journal:
International Journal of Criminal Justice Sciences
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://www.sascv.org/ijcjs/aisha.html
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0973-5089
Appears in Collections:
Department of Social Sciences Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGill, Aishaen
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-15T20:29:55Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-15T20:29:55Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.issn0973-5089-
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.sascv.org/ijcjs/aisha.html-
dc.description.abstractThis article explains how notions or honour can act as catalysts for so-called honour-based violence when ideas of family and community are challenged by women, and highlights a number of recent and high-profile examples of honour crimes in the UK. A key question is how these crimes should be regarded in the context of our increasingly multi-cultural society. The article examines the way in which the British media have reported these crimes has misrepresented ethnic minorities and engendered a sense of mainstream moral superiority. Furthermore, it argues that a better understanding of the relationship between culture and morality could lead to a more nuanced approach to the construction of a human rights framework. But we must guard against two dangers: on the one hand the danger of universalising what are merely western feminist ideas of morality, and on the other of tolerating human rights violations for the sake of multi-cultural accommodation.-
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Aisha Gill (a.gill@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-02-15T17:10:05Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-02-15T20:29:55Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-02-15T20:29:55Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2006en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Journal of Criminal Justice Sciencesen
dc.titlePatriarchal violence in the name of ‘honour’en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Criminal Justice Sciencesen
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