A case study of learning in a Thai manufacturing organization

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/91136
Title:
A case study of learning in a Thai manufacturing organization
Authors:
Lim, Lynn L.K.; Laosirihongthong, Tritos; Chan, Christopher C.A.
Abstract:
This study examines the relationships between individual, team and organizational learning of 1103 workers from a Thai manufacturing organization. Individual learning was conceptualized in terms of individuals’ learning strategies and motivation to learn. Team learning consisted of internal team learning and external team learning. Organizational learning was believed to be underpinned by commitment to learning, shared vision and open mindedness. These three levels of learning were inter-related. Thus, individuals who are interested in self development are more likely to contribute positively to teamwork and the benefits from the team learning could flow to the organizational level. The theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
Publisher:
Clute Institute
Journal:
Journal of Applied Business Research
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://journals.cluteonline.com/index.php/JABR/article/view/1435
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0892-7626
Appears in Collections:
Roehampton Business School Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLim, Lynn L.K.en
dc.contributor.authorLaosirihongthong, Tritosen
dc.contributor.authorChan, Christopher C.A.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-04T09:04:46Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-04T09:04:46Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.issn0892-7626-
dc.identifier.urihttp://journals.cluteonline.com/index.php/JABR/article/view/1435-
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the relationships between individual, team and organizational learning of 1103 workers from a Thai manufacturing organization. Individual learning was conceptualized in terms of individuals’ learning strategies and motivation to learn. Team learning consisted of internal team learning and external team learning. Organizational learning was believed to be underpinned by commitment to learning, shared vision and open mindedness. These three levels of learning were inter-related. Thus, individuals who are interested in self development are more likely to contribute positively to teamwork and the benefits from the team learning could flow to the organizational level. The theoretical and practical implications are discussed.-
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Lynn Lim (l.lim@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-02-02T19:18:01Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-02-04T09:04:46Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-02-04T09:04:46Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2006en
dc.publisherClute Instituteen
dc.titleA case study of learning in a Thai manufacturing organizationen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Applied Business Researchen
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