Do community psychiatric nurses perceive a need for post-registration psychotherapy training? A phenomenological study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90437
Title:
Do community psychiatric nurses perceive a need for post-registration psychotherapy training? A phenomenological study
Authors:
Aladin, Pearl
Abstract:
Published literature on the psychotherapeutic training needs of CPNs in relation to their generic caseload has repeatedly established the need for appropriate training for CPNs in order to help them provide the necessary psychotherapeutic interventions for this client group. This phenomenological study is designed to gain an understanding as to whether CPNs themselves perceive a need for post-registration psychotherapy training. The phenomenological method that underpins Husserl’s transcendental phenomenology was used. Using semi-structured interviews, data was collected from two focus groups consisting of four CPNs working for the same Trust. Analysis of the data was conducted using Colaizzi’s (1978) procedural steps, which involved extracting significant statements from the participants from which meanings were formulated. Statements were then grouped into clusters of themes to form an exhaustive description. The final stage involved returning to the participants, the exhaustive description of their perceptions for the need of post-registration psychotherapy training for validation. Psychodynamic psychotherapy training was not viewed positively by the participants, however a preference for behavioural psychotherapy, as in CBT skills, was consistently voiced.
Issue Date:
2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90437
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Department of Psychology Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAladin, Pearlen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-22T14:50:44Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-22T14:50:44Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/90437-
dc.description.abstractPublished literature on the psychotherapeutic training needs of CPNs in relation to their generic caseload has repeatedly established the need for appropriate training for CPNs in order to help them provide the necessary psychotherapeutic interventions for this client group. This phenomenological study is designed to gain an understanding as to whether CPNs themselves perceive a need for post-registration psychotherapy training. The phenomenological method that underpins Husserl’s transcendental phenomenology was used. Using semi-structured interviews, data was collected from two focus groups consisting of four CPNs working for the same Trust. Analysis of the data was conducted using Colaizzi’s (1978) procedural steps, which involved extracting significant statements from the participants from which meanings were formulated. Statements were then grouped into clusters of themes to form an exhaustive description. The final stage involved returning to the participants, the exhaustive description of their perceptions for the need of post-registration psychotherapy training for validation. Psychodynamic psychotherapy training was not viewed positively by the participants, however a preference for behavioural psychotherapy, as in CBT skills, was consistently voiced.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Del Loewenthal (d.loewenthal@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-22T14:37:31Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-22T14:50:43Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-01-22T14:50:44Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2001en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCommunity Psychiatric Nursesen
dc.subjectCounsellingen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectTrainingen
dc.subjectColaizzien
dc.titleDo community psychiatric nurses perceive a need for post-registration psychotherapy training? A phenomenological studyen
dc.typeThesisen
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