Working with suicidal clients: What are the possible effects on the therapist?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90429
Title:
Working with suicidal clients: What are the possible effects on the therapist?
Authors:
Scupham, Susan
Abstract:
The subjects of suicide and attempted suicide have received considerable attention over recent years through the media and government interventions to reduce significantly the rate of deaths by suicide in the UK. Those in the field of counselling and psychotherapy have responded to the escalating suicide and attempted suicide rates by producing articles, guidelines and procedures on the subject. The purpose of this research study is to examine the question ‘working with suicidal clients: what are the possible effects on the therapist?’ The study uses a discourse analysis approach to analyse seven transcripts of interviews with therapists speaking about their experiences. The historical, cultural and religious views of suicide are looked at along with a literature review of current research in the area of the effects of working with suicidal clients on therapists. Six interpretative repertoires were discovered in the transcripts of power, impotence, identification, distancing, relationship and impact. From these repertoires, the findings would indicate that therapists experience a considerable variety of feelings and a certain amount of anxiety when clients disclose suicidal intentions. The research would also suggest that the stress which therapists felt when working with suicidal clients was more significant than any other client behaviour or communication. Issues such as the therapists being able to endure the strong negative transference, which can be communicated by suicidal clients, is also examined. The study concludes with recommendations for further research into the effects of working with suicidal clients on the therapist, including the long term effect. Also as to why male therapists felt equipped and female therapists felt less equipped to work with suicidal clients is an area which could be explored further. The implications of this study would seem to be of value for training, supervision and practice.
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90429
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
UKCP Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorScupham, Susanen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-22T14:48:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-22T14:48:17Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/90429-
dc.description.abstractThe subjects of suicide and attempted suicide have received considerable attention over recent years through the media and government interventions to reduce significantly the rate of deaths by suicide in the UK. Those in the field of counselling and psychotherapy have responded to the escalating suicide and attempted suicide rates by producing articles, guidelines and procedures on the subject. The purpose of this research study is to examine the question ‘working with suicidal clients: what are the possible effects on the therapist?’ The study uses a discourse analysis approach to analyse seven transcripts of interviews with therapists speaking about their experiences. The historical, cultural and religious views of suicide are looked at along with a literature review of current research in the area of the effects of working with suicidal clients on therapists. Six interpretative repertoires were discovered in the transcripts of power, impotence, identification, distancing, relationship and impact. From these repertoires, the findings would indicate that therapists experience a considerable variety of feelings and a certain amount of anxiety when clients disclose suicidal intentions. The research would also suggest that the stress which therapists felt when working with suicidal clients was more significant than any other client behaviour or communication. Issues such as the therapists being able to endure the strong negative transference, which can be communicated by suicidal clients, is also examined. The study concludes with recommendations for further research into the effects of working with suicidal clients on the therapist, including the long term effect. Also as to why male therapists felt equipped and female therapists felt less equipped to work with suicidal clients is an area which could be explored further. The implications of this study would seem to be of value for training, supervision and practice.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Del Loewenthal (d.loewenthal@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-22T13:48:58Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-22T14:48:17Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-01-22T14:48:17Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2005en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCounsellingen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectSuicideen
dc.subjectDiscourse analysisen
dc.subjectEffect on therapisten
dc.titleWorking with suicidal clients: What are the possible effects on the therapist?en
dc.typeThesisen
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