The relevance of counselling and psychotherapy for carers of looked after children in institutional settings.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90427
Title:
The relevance of counselling and psychotherapy for carers of looked after children in institutional settings.
Authors:
Pagella, Susan
Abstract:
This small scale research study has sought to raise the issue of whether there is a need for counselling and psychotherapy for carers of looked after children in institutional settings. The researcher’s awareness of links between her own past experiencing and the choice of a career within education is used as a precursor to explore the relationship between childhood experience, regarding career choice for carers of looked after children in institutional settings (the wounded healer) and the implication of this for their mental wellbeing as a result of engaging in this role. The literature search outlined has been conducted using a number of keywords: Counselling, Psychotherapy, carer, looked after and institutional. Subsequently, this search needed to be widened – using carer as a generic term due to the dearth of relevant information. This sparsity of information revealed the need to investigate this apparently under-researched area of the caring professions. The theme of defining a choice of research methodology is explored from a philosophic and experiential route, culminating the rationale for using heuristics, as opposed to that of grounded theory or phenomenology. The progress and method of interviewing research participants and collecting data is discussed, as is the initial rationale for proceeding with only one research participant, resulting in the need to undertake a second ‘trawl’ for further participants. The final phase of heuristic research – the process of creative synthesis – is presented in the form of a poem and attempts to explicate the meaning and experiencing of the research participant’s life and work within their roles as carers of looked after children in institutional settings. The study concludes by addressing the persuasive effect of the original participant’s story upon the researcher. The lack of supervision for carers of looked after children, issues regarding inadequate training and the absence of a structured selection process when recruiting carers; a hypothesis regarding the reticence of this group of care givers to participate in the research. Finally, the study culminates in the presenting of the ‘voice of the other’ in a way that it can speak for itself by finding some answers to the research question.
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90427
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
UKCP Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPagella, Susanen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-22T14:47:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-22T14:47:57Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/90427-
dc.description.abstractThis small scale research study has sought to raise the issue of whether there is a need for counselling and psychotherapy for carers of looked after children in institutional settings. The researcher’s awareness of links between her own past experiencing and the choice of a career within education is used as a precursor to explore the relationship between childhood experience, regarding career choice for carers of looked after children in institutional settings (the wounded healer) and the implication of this for their mental wellbeing as a result of engaging in this role. The literature search outlined has been conducted using a number of keywords: Counselling, Psychotherapy, carer, looked after and institutional. Subsequently, this search needed to be widened – using carer as a generic term due to the dearth of relevant information. This sparsity of information revealed the need to investigate this apparently under-researched area of the caring professions. The theme of defining a choice of research methodology is explored from a philosophic and experiential route, culminating the rationale for using heuristics, as opposed to that of grounded theory or phenomenology. The progress and method of interviewing research participants and collecting data is discussed, as is the initial rationale for proceeding with only one research participant, resulting in the need to undertake a second ‘trawl’ for further participants. The final phase of heuristic research – the process of creative synthesis – is presented in the form of a poem and attempts to explicate the meaning and experiencing of the research participant’s life and work within their roles as carers of looked after children in institutional settings. The study concludes by addressing the persuasive effect of the original participant’s story upon the researcher. The lack of supervision for carers of looked after children, issues regarding inadequate training and the absence of a structured selection process when recruiting carers; a hypothesis regarding the reticence of this group of care givers to participate in the research. Finally, the study culminates in the presenting of the ‘voice of the other’ in a way that it can speak for itself by finding some answers to the research question.en
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dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCounsellingen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectCarersen
dc.subjectLooked after childrenen
dc.subjectHeuristicsen
dc.titleThe relevance of counselling and psychotherapy for carers of looked after children in institutional settings.en
dc.typeThesisen
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