A case study investigation into whether there is a need for a counselling/psychotherapy service for people who have experienced the death of a pet dog?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90424
Title:
A case study investigation into whether there is a need for a counselling/psychotherapy service for people who have experienced the death of a pet dog?
Authors:
Poulson, Deborah
Abstract:
With the continuing increase in the awareness of the popularity of pets, there is a surprising lack of literature concerning the role of therapy services in relation to the needs of those who have been bereaved of a much loved pet dog or companion animal. Existing literature indicates that the grief reaction is not dissimilar to that experienced after the death of a person and the impact of the loss will depend on the type of relationship with the deceased. In view of the little attention focussed on whether there is a need to offer therapy to those individuals who have suffered the death of such a pet, this study sets out to examine whether there is a need to provide this facility. By making this service available, it will give people the choice to speak about the experience. The chosen method is case study, which is followed by an examination as to whether this was suitable, as well as the constraints encountered as a result of this approach. The case study comprises one male client. A summary of the meetings with the researcher is explored. This includes a comparison of the implications of existentialism/phenomenology, psychoanalysis and postmodernism in relation to therapeutic practice. In an attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of the therapy, the concept of the client’s health is addressed. One of the findings of this study revealed the difficulties encountered as a result of the therapist and researcher being the same person. A further discovery was that the apparent motive for seeking therapy was quite different from the researcher’s original notion. Recommendations for further study are made and conclusions drawn. Whether there is a specific role for a pet dog bereavement counsellor is discussed.
Issue Date:
2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90424
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
UKCP Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPoulson, Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-22T14:47:16Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-22T14:47:16Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/90424-
dc.description.abstractWith the continuing increase in the awareness of the popularity of pets, there is a surprising lack of literature concerning the role of therapy services in relation to the needs of those who have been bereaved of a much loved pet dog or companion animal. Existing literature indicates that the grief reaction is not dissimilar to that experienced after the death of a person and the impact of the loss will depend on the type of relationship with the deceased. In view of the little attention focussed on whether there is a need to offer therapy to those individuals who have suffered the death of such a pet, this study sets out to examine whether there is a need to provide this facility. By making this service available, it will give people the choice to speak about the experience. The chosen method is case study, which is followed by an examination as to whether this was suitable, as well as the constraints encountered as a result of this approach. The case study comprises one male client. A summary of the meetings with the researcher is explored. This includes a comparison of the implications of existentialism/phenomenology, psychoanalysis and postmodernism in relation to therapeutic practice. In an attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of the therapy, the concept of the client’s health is addressed. One of the findings of this study revealed the difficulties encountered as a result of the therapist and researcher being the same person. A further discovery was that the apparent motive for seeking therapy was quite different from the researcher’s original notion. Recommendations for further study are made and conclusions drawn. Whether there is a specific role for a pet dog bereavement counsellor is discussed.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Del Loewenthal (d.loewenthal@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-22T13:41:10Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-22T14:47:15Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-01-22T14:47:16Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2001en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCounsellingen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectBereavementen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectCase studyen
dc.titleA case study investigation into whether there is a need for a counselling/psychotherapy service for people who have experienced the death of a pet dog?en
dc.typeThesisen
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