Is counselling and psychotherapy training beneficial to health visitors working with clients experiencing postnatal depression?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90419
Title:
Is counselling and psychotherapy training beneficial to health visitors working with clients experiencing postnatal depression?
Authors:
Morris, Clovine
Abstract:
A rationale is presented for the use of counselling and psychotherapy skills in helping relationships when the experience of help is that help is realised. In the metamorphosis of health visiting practice, health visitors have changed from child-focused initiatives to providing a more family-centred public health approach. Promoting mental health is a core component of this new agenda and providing support to women at vulnerable times, ie childbirth, is a focal point of health visitors’ work. The pressing health challenges and effects on children when women are affected by postnatal depression often lead to mental health problems and failure to achieve desired goals. Growing awareness of postnatal depression has meant that health visitors’ practice now includes the screening, detection and management of women experiencing the condition. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is a strategy that appears to be gaining credibility as a detection tool for postnatal depression and health visitors are being trained in its use, which involves offering non-directive counselling (listening visits) to clients. Due to the complexity of postnatal depression, there is concern that health visitors may not be sufficiently trained to carry out the work. This research project aims to explore how experienced health visitors with counselling/psychotherapy training use the skills in their work with postnatally depressed women, and to ascertain whether counselling/psychotherapy training would provide appropriate training for health visitors working with postnatally depressed women. Interviews were conducted, transcribed and analysed using a grounded theory method. The core theme that emerged confirmed that counselling and psychotherapy training produced invaluable skills that were transferable to health visitors’ work. However, the role of the health visitor and that of the counsellor were different and not interchangeable and that professional boundaries must be observed.
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90419
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
UKCP Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Clovineen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-22T14:44:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-22T14:44:59Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/90419-
dc.description.abstractA rationale is presented for the use of counselling and psychotherapy skills in helping relationships when the experience of help is that help is realised. In the metamorphosis of health visiting practice, health visitors have changed from child-focused initiatives to providing a more family-centred public health approach. Promoting mental health is a core component of this new agenda and providing support to women at vulnerable times, ie childbirth, is a focal point of health visitors’ work. The pressing health challenges and effects on children when women are affected by postnatal depression often lead to mental health problems and failure to achieve desired goals. Growing awareness of postnatal depression has meant that health visitors’ practice now includes the screening, detection and management of women experiencing the condition. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is a strategy that appears to be gaining credibility as a detection tool for postnatal depression and health visitors are being trained in its use, which involves offering non-directive counselling (listening visits) to clients. Due to the complexity of postnatal depression, there is concern that health visitors may not be sufficiently trained to carry out the work. This research project aims to explore how experienced health visitors with counselling/psychotherapy training use the skills in their work with postnatally depressed women, and to ascertain whether counselling/psychotherapy training would provide appropriate training for health visitors working with postnatally depressed women. Interviews were conducted, transcribed and analysed using a grounded theory method. The core theme that emerged confirmed that counselling and psychotherapy training produced invaluable skills that were transferable to health visitors’ work. However, the role of the health visitor and that of the counsellor were different and not interchangeable and that professional boundaries must be observed.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Del Loewenthal (d.loewenthal@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-22T13:25:56Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-22T14:44:59Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-01-22T14:44:59Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2004en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCounsellingen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectHealth Visitorsen
dc.subjectPost natal depressionen
dc.titleIs counselling and psychotherapy training beneficial to health visitors working with clients experiencing postnatal depression?en
dc.typeThesisen
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