In what way, if any, can counselling and psychotherapy help individuals with dyslexia? A heuristic inquiry.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90417
Title:
In what way, if any, can counselling and psychotherapy help individuals with dyslexia? A heuristic inquiry.
Authors:
Morton, Jean
Abstract:
Being dyslexic has an effect on the personal, social and emotional aspects of people’s lives. Children with dyslexia constantly underperform at school, often disappoint themselves and confuse their parents and teachers. They may come to question their own worthiness, coming to believe they are defective or inferior, internalising the feeling that they are ‘stupid’. When unrecognised and untreated in early life, children may experience emotional and behavioural problems. This small scale research study examines the experience of seven adult participants whose dyslexia went undiagnosed in childhood. The study depicts the experience of confusion and shame on recognising difference and of not understanding why they were constantly experiencing failure. The research explores the experience of their unrecognised disability and then examines their experience in counselling/psychotherapy. The study concludes that differing degrees of healing, learning and acceptance of self can take place in therapy, that it is the therapeutic relationship, in the present, that produces healing and learning. The therapeutic relationship allows the participant to interpret the past differently and to find new meanings for past experience, encouraging healing, learning and self-acceptance to emerge in the present. The research required a qualitative method to explore the experience of the participants. A method in the interpretative tradition, which enabled the researcher to take up the position of a participant whose presence cannot be separated from what was being observed. A heuristic approach was therefore selected as the most appropriate method, as a way of self-inquiry and dialogue with others, aimed at finding the underlying meanings of an important human experience.
Issue Date:
2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90417
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
UKCP Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorton, Jeanen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-22T14:44:12Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-22T14:44:12Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/90417-
dc.description.abstractBeing dyslexic has an effect on the personal, social and emotional aspects of people’s lives. Children with dyslexia constantly underperform at school, often disappoint themselves and confuse their parents and teachers. They may come to question their own worthiness, coming to believe they are defective or inferior, internalising the feeling that they are ‘stupid’. When unrecognised and untreated in early life, children may experience emotional and behavioural problems. This small scale research study examines the experience of seven adult participants whose dyslexia went undiagnosed in childhood. The study depicts the experience of confusion and shame on recognising difference and of not understanding why they were constantly experiencing failure. The research explores the experience of their unrecognised disability and then examines their experience in counselling/psychotherapy. The study concludes that differing degrees of healing, learning and acceptance of self can take place in therapy, that it is the therapeutic relationship, in the present, that produces healing and learning. The therapeutic relationship allows the participant to interpret the past differently and to find new meanings for past experience, encouraging healing, learning and self-acceptance to emerge in the present. The research required a qualitative method to explore the experience of the participants. A method in the interpretative tradition, which enabled the researcher to take up the position of a participant whose presence cannot be separated from what was being observed. A heuristic approach was therefore selected as the most appropriate method, as a way of self-inquiry and dialogue with others, aimed at finding the underlying meanings of an important human experience.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Del Loewenthal (d.loewenthal@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-22T13:23:27Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-22T14:44:12Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-01-22T14:44:12Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2003en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectDyslexiaen
dc.subjectCounsellingen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectHeuristicsen
dc.titleIn what way, if any, can counselling and psychotherapy help individuals with dyslexia? A heuristic inquiry.en
dc.typeThesisen
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