‘What is it really like to have a miscarriage? Let’s talk it out’

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90407
Title:
‘What is it really like to have a miscarriage? Let’s talk it out’
Authors:
Clarke, Joan
Abstract:
Miscarriage is one of the most common medical problems that occur in pregnancy (Witzel: Chartier 1980). The purpose of the study was to examine the experiences of women who have miscarriages and to gain an understanding of what the experience means for them. A qualitative, phenomenological methodology was utilized throughout the study. This method was chosen as it seemed an appropriate way to study with the informants rather than to study the informants. The quest is not to give a complete picture of anyone’s perception of the experience, but to endeavour to provide a clearer understanding of women’s feelings about miscarriage. The study outcome is a plausible, written narrative that offers a tenable theoretical description of the participants’ experiences. The findings suggest that women experience miscarriage as a traumatic event and that socially and medically it is treated as a non-event. The need for ‘support’, ‘information’ and a ‘voice’ were highlighted; these may have implications for the health visiting service. In the light of this it would seem pertinent to suggest that the present health visiting service fails women who have miscarriages.
Issue Date:
1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90407
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
UKCP Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Joanen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-22T14:48:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-22T14:48:47Z-
dc.date.issued1995-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/90407-
dc.description.abstractMiscarriage is one of the most common medical problems that occur in pregnancy (Witzel: Chartier 1980). The purpose of the study was to examine the experiences of women who have miscarriages and to gain an understanding of what the experience means for them. A qualitative, phenomenological methodology was utilized throughout the study. This method was chosen as it seemed an appropriate way to study with the informants rather than to study the informants. The quest is not to give a complete picture of anyone’s perception of the experience, but to endeavour to provide a clearer understanding of women’s feelings about miscarriage. The study outcome is a plausible, written narrative that offers a tenable theoretical description of the participants’ experiences. The findings suggest that women experience miscarriage as a traumatic event and that socially and medically it is treated as a non-event. The need for ‘support’, ‘information’ and a ‘voice’ were highlighted; these may have implications for the health visiting service. In the light of this it would seem pertinent to suggest that the present health visiting service fails women who have miscarriages.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Del Loewenthal (d.loewenthal@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-22T13:52:19Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-22T14:48:47Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-01-22T14:48:47Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 1995en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectCounsellingen
dc.subjectMiscarriageen
dc.subjectQualitative researchen
dc.subjectNarrativeen
dc.subjectExperienceen
dc.title‘What is it really like to have a miscarriage? Let’s talk it out’en
dc.typeThesisen
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