Men’s experience of psychotherapy following a diagnosis of major depression.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90397
Title:
Men’s experience of psychotherapy following a diagnosis of major depression.
Authors:
Morrison, John
Abstract:
This study aims to explore the research question: Men’s experience of psychotherapy following a diagnosis of major depression. Did psychotherapy influence their recovery? The researcher is a final year student on an MSc programme and through this study seeks to qualify for an MSc in Counselling in Psychotherapy. The context of the research is within the National Health Service (NHS) at the secondary level of care (ie between the Community Mental Health Team – CMHT – and the Psychology Department). The five males had been referred through primary care GP to Consultant Psychiatrist and the CMHT. Following assessment, diagnosis and medication they had been referred to the Psychology Department for therapy. The study provides the researcher with an opportunity to extend knowledge that may prove helpful in developing the quality of psychological care at the interface between CMHT and the Psychology Department, particularly for those clients for whom psychotherapy might support their recovery. The study is set against a background of major changes within the NHS. The National Service Framework (NSF) advocates the promotion of a social care perspective and the provision of psychological therapies at both primary and secondary care levels. The study uses a qualitative research approach, taking Grounded Theory as described by Glaser and Strauss (1967) as the methodology. The researcher examined the transcripts of semi-structured interviews with five males. Three interconnected categories emerged; awareness; therapeutic process; and outcome. The implications of these findings are discussed, one of which acknowledges the men’s concerns about the systems over-reliance on medication as a response to depression and the difficulties for them in accessing therapy within the NHS. Some recommendations are offered, one of which is the provision of information in relation to the process and availability of psychotherapy, perhaps this information could be offered at the initial CNHT assessment when treatment responses are being considered. The men’s experience of psychotherapy shows the potential for psychotherapy in reducing the clients’ reliance on medication and their dependence on help from GPs, psychiatric series and other professionals. The literature search finds that at the secondary level of care, a combination of medication and psychotherapy provides best outcomes in terms of clinical effectiveness. This is confirmed by Roth and Fonagy (1996).
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90397
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
UKCP Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-22T14:44:48Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-22T14:44:48Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/90397-
dc.description.abstractThis study aims to explore the research question: Men’s experience of psychotherapy following a diagnosis of major depression. Did psychotherapy influence their recovery? The researcher is a final year student on an MSc programme and through this study seeks to qualify for an MSc in Counselling in Psychotherapy. The context of the research is within the National Health Service (NHS) at the secondary level of care (ie between the Community Mental Health Team – CMHT – and the Psychology Department). The five males had been referred through primary care GP to Consultant Psychiatrist and the CMHT. Following assessment, diagnosis and medication they had been referred to the Psychology Department for therapy. The study provides the researcher with an opportunity to extend knowledge that may prove helpful in developing the quality of psychological care at the interface between CMHT and the Psychology Department, particularly for those clients for whom psychotherapy might support their recovery. The study is set against a background of major changes within the NHS. The National Service Framework (NSF) advocates the promotion of a social care perspective and the provision of psychological therapies at both primary and secondary care levels. The study uses a qualitative research approach, taking Grounded Theory as described by Glaser and Strauss (1967) as the methodology. The researcher examined the transcripts of semi-structured interviews with five males. Three interconnected categories emerged; awareness; therapeutic process; and outcome. The implications of these findings are discussed, one of which acknowledges the men’s concerns about the systems over-reliance on medication as a response to depression and the difficulties for them in accessing therapy within the NHS. Some recommendations are offered, one of which is the provision of information in relation to the process and availability of psychotherapy, perhaps this information could be offered at the initial CNHT assessment when treatment responses are being considered. The men’s experience of psychotherapy shows the potential for psychotherapy in reducing the clients’ reliance on medication and their dependence on help from GPs, psychiatric series and other professionals. The literature search finds that at the secondary level of care, a combination of medication and psychotherapy provides best outcomes in terms of clinical effectiveness. This is confirmed by Roth and Fonagy (1996).en
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dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCounsellingen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectMenen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectGrounded Theoryen
dc.titleMen’s experience of psychotherapy following a diagnosis of major depression.en
dc.typeThesisen
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