An exploration of the issues arising for a coach, who is a trained counsellor or psychotherapist, when the coaching relationship moves from improving the client’s performance at work to their personal life.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90341
Title:
An exploration of the issues arising for a coach, who is a trained counsellor or psychotherapist, when the coaching relationship moves from improving the client’s performance at work to their personal life.
Authors:
Channer, Philip
Abstract:
Executive coaches who had a therapeutic training may face a range of professional, commercial and personal issues when a coaching client’s personal life enters into the work, since they can find themselves approaching, or working within, material which they would otherwise address through therapy. Coaching is still in the process of emerging as a profession, and its boundaries with therapy are poorly defined. The literature recognises this, and identifies some of the issues facing the coach in such a situation, calling for steps to improve the training and guidelines for coaches. This research aims to explore the lived experience of the coach in order to increase understanding of the issues, and of what lies behind them. A heuristic approach has been selected to facilitate data gathering and to reflect the autobiographical nature of the topic. The study confirms the challenges that a therapeutic training can bring to a coach in these client situations, and indicates that the range of issues faced by a coach is broader than previously identified. It concludes that while action is necessary to protect the interests of the client, what may have been understated is the need to protect those of the coach. This is the responsibility of those who train, employ, supervise and commission coaches, as well as of the coaches themselves. The study supports the literature’s call for more governance for coaching, and makes suggestions as to what sorts of actions might be appropriate. A discussion of the heuristic approach identifies the advantage of exposing and harnessing a researcher’s own understanding of the topic, but also the potential limitation in that in a positivistic context this may be portrayed as reducing validity.
Issue Date:
2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90341
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
UKCP Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChanner, Philipen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-22T10:48:31Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-22T10:48:31Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/90341-
dc.description.abstractExecutive coaches who had a therapeutic training may face a range of professional, commercial and personal issues when a coaching client’s personal life enters into the work, since they can find themselves approaching, or working within, material which they would otherwise address through therapy. Coaching is still in the process of emerging as a profession, and its boundaries with therapy are poorly defined. The literature recognises this, and identifies some of the issues facing the coach in such a situation, calling for steps to improve the training and guidelines for coaches. This research aims to explore the lived experience of the coach in order to increase understanding of the issues, and of what lies behind them. A heuristic approach has been selected to facilitate data gathering and to reflect the autobiographical nature of the topic. The study confirms the challenges that a therapeutic training can bring to a coach in these client situations, and indicates that the range of issues faced by a coach is broader than previously identified. It concludes that while action is necessary to protect the interests of the client, what may have been understated is the need to protect those of the coach. This is the responsibility of those who train, employ, supervise and commission coaches, as well as of the coaches themselves. The study supports the literature’s call for more governance for coaching, and makes suggestions as to what sorts of actions might be appropriate. A discussion of the heuristic approach identifies the advantage of exposing and harnessing a researcher’s own understanding of the topic, but also the potential limitation in that in a positivistic context this may be portrayed as reducing validity.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Del Loewenthal (d.loewenthal@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-20T20:01:53Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-22T10:48:31Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-01-22T10:48:31Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2003en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHeuristicsen
dc.subjectCoachingen
dc.subjectCounsellingen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.titleAn exploration of the issues arising for a coach, who is a trained counsellor or psychotherapist, when the coaching relationship moves from improving the client’s performance at work to their personal life.en
dc.typeThesisen
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