Clients and Counsellors’ perception of the helpful and unhelpful aspects of the counselling session

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90016
Title:
Clients and Counsellors’ perception of the helpful and unhelpful aspects of the counselling session
Authors:
Pillay, Dionysia
Abstract:
Acceptance, genuineness and empathy are thought to be necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic change. This study looks at the helpful and unhelpful aspects of the counselling session. It used an open ended questionnaire to explore clients’ and their counsellors’ views of their experiences in the counselling session and a 24 statement relationship inventory to qualify the counselling session in terms of the three conditions of acceptance, empathy and genuineness. The respondants are: clients who had consulted their GP for depression and were referred for counselling, and their counsellors who were CPN by profession with counselling training. They were of humanistic/phenomenological backgrounds. The findings confirmed the hypothesis that counselling provided in the GP practice is helpful to clients who suffer from depression.
Issue Date:
1994
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90016
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
UKCP Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPillay, Dionysiaen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-19T15:39:06Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-19T15:39:06Z-
dc.date.issued1994-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/90016-
dc.description.abstractAcceptance, genuineness and empathy are thought to be necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic change. This study looks at the helpful and unhelpful aspects of the counselling session. It used an open ended questionnaire to explore clients’ and their counsellors’ views of their experiences in the counselling session and a 24 statement relationship inventory to qualify the counselling session in terms of the three conditions of acceptance, empathy and genuineness. The respondants are: clients who had consulted their GP for depression and were referred for counselling, and their counsellors who were CPN by profession with counselling training. They were of humanistic/phenomenological backgrounds. The findings confirmed the hypothesis that counselling provided in the GP practice is helpful to clients who suffer from depression.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Del Loewenthal (d.loewenthal@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-19T14:58:57Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-19T15:39:06Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-01-19T15:39:06Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 1994en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectTherapeutic changeen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectCounsellingen
dc.subjectCore conditionsen
dc.titleClients and Counsellors’ perception of the helpful and unhelpful aspects of the counselling sessionen
dc.typeThesisen
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