Family mental illness and the career choice of the Psychotherapist

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90015
Title:
Family mental illness and the career choice of the Psychotherapist
Authors:
Cordingley, Sophie
Abstract:
This qualitative study examines the career choice of psychotherapists who have come from a background in which a family member from the family of origin suffered with a mental illness or disorder. A heuristic approach was used, based on unstructured in depth interviews with seven counsellors and psychotherapists. The literature review summarises previous research findings and recommendations in the area of career choice to be a psychotherapist, and family background. This subject has been debated by psychoanalytical writers, however, this topic does not appear to have been explored significantly by any other psychotherapeutic approaches. Therefore attention is given to underpinning psychoanalytical theories: one, in particular, by Miller is of specific interest to the research question as she suggests that all psychotherapists have a ‘narcissistic disturbance’ stemming from their family background, which pre-empts them in their choice of career. This idea is explored further in the literature review. From the findings, certain themes emerged from the participants’ stories, such as the therapists’ feelings of guilt and badness as children, role reversal in family of origin with the child attending to the adults needs. The development of increased intuitive skills, as a result of the observation of their family members, the need to make sense of their family background, and the desire to break the mould of previous family functioning were also identified. The findings appeared consistent with the majority of previous research in this field, as reviewed in the discussion. Clinical implications for psychotherapy practice are identified, which concur with previous researchers, namely that it may be useful for psychotherapy trainees to consider their motivations to become therapists. An understanding of the trainee’s family dynamics may be useful in consideration of potential counter-transference issues. Finally, it is recommended that this area should be explored further as it is pertinent to the work of psychotherapists.
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90015
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
UKCP Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCordingley, Sophieen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-19T15:38:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-19T15:38:56Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/90015-
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative study examines the career choice of psychotherapists who have come from a background in which a family member from the family of origin suffered with a mental illness or disorder. A heuristic approach was used, based on unstructured in depth interviews with seven counsellors and psychotherapists. The literature review summarises previous research findings and recommendations in the area of career choice to be a psychotherapist, and family background. This subject has been debated by psychoanalytical writers, however, this topic does not appear to have been explored significantly by any other psychotherapeutic approaches. Therefore attention is given to underpinning psychoanalytical theories: one, in particular, by Miller is of specific interest to the research question as she suggests that all psychotherapists have a ‘narcissistic disturbance’ stemming from their family background, which pre-empts them in their choice of career. This idea is explored further in the literature review. From the findings, certain themes emerged from the participants’ stories, such as the therapists’ feelings of guilt and badness as children, role reversal in family of origin with the child attending to the adults needs. The development of increased intuitive skills, as a result of the observation of their family members, the need to make sense of their family background, and the desire to break the mould of previous family functioning were also identified. The findings appeared consistent with the majority of previous research in this field, as reviewed in the discussion. Clinical implications for psychotherapy practice are identified, which concur with previous researchers, namely that it may be useful for psychotherapy trainees to consider their motivations to become therapists. An understanding of the trainee’s family dynamics may be useful in consideration of potential counter-transference issues. Finally, it is recommended that this area should be explored further as it is pertinent to the work of psychotherapists.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Del Loewenthal (d.loewenthal@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-19T14:57:11Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-19T15:38:55Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-01-19T15:38:56Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2005en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectFamily mental illnessen
dc.subjectCounsellingen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectmotivationen
dc.subjectHeuristicsen
dc.titleFamily mental illness and the career choice of the Psychotherapisten
dc.typeThesisen
All Items in RURR are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.