What, if anything, might you share with your client if something about their story touches your own?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90014
Title:
What, if anything, might you share with your client if something about their story touches your own?
Authors:
Critchley, Pamela
Abstract:
This study examines five therapists experience of self-disclosing to their clients, when something about their client’s story touches their own experiences. The researcher’s underlying interest in the study is about the place of the therapist in the therapeutic relationship, to observe ‘where the therapist is responding from’ (Loewenthal & Snell 2003:113). The study looks at the historical and theoretical place of therapist disclosure by exploring literature and research on the subject. The difficulty in establishing a universal definition or understanding of what therapist self-disclosure is, or means to individuals, is discussed. Ethical implications, benefits and risks of therapist disclosure are reviewed. The debate is considered about whether therapists should or should not disclose, and if they do, what and how much should they disclose. Using Giorgi’s (1985) descriptive phenomenological method, the researcher observes the emerging phenomenon of anxiety surrounding the experiences of self disclosure for a therapist. Giorgi’s 1985 method is critiqued in the discussion which includes the researcher’s difficulties surrounding her attempt to ‘bracket’ assumptions, the Husserlian epoché. The researcher discusses difficulties concerning what is meant by meaning, description and experience and considers the possible place of the unconscious. The findings are discussed in relation to various philosophical theories relating to psychotherapy. The implications from this research for both trainee therapists and experienced therapists are the important and significant place of both personal therapy and clinical supervision. For training organisation, the implications are that they should ensure the trainees are supported as they develop a growing understanding of their place in the therapeutic relationship and an increasing awareness of where, as a therapist, they are responding from. In respect of self-disclosure as a therapeutic intervention, the findings imply the need for judicious caution, particularly in respect of ethical implications of non-maleficience and beneficience.
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90014
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
UKCP Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCritchley, Pamelaen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-19T15:38:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-19T15:38:35Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/90014-
dc.description.abstractThis study examines five therapists experience of self-disclosing to their clients, when something about their client’s story touches their own experiences. The researcher’s underlying interest in the study is about the place of the therapist in the therapeutic relationship, to observe ‘where the therapist is responding from’ (Loewenthal & Snell 2003:113). The study looks at the historical and theoretical place of therapist disclosure by exploring literature and research on the subject. The difficulty in establishing a universal definition or understanding of what therapist self-disclosure is, or means to individuals, is discussed. Ethical implications, benefits and risks of therapist disclosure are reviewed. The debate is considered about whether therapists should or should not disclose, and if they do, what and how much should they disclose. Using Giorgi’s (1985) descriptive phenomenological method, the researcher observes the emerging phenomenon of anxiety surrounding the experiences of self disclosure for a therapist. Giorgi’s 1985 method is critiqued in the discussion which includes the researcher’s difficulties surrounding her attempt to ‘bracket’ assumptions, the Husserlian epoché. The researcher discusses difficulties concerning what is meant by meaning, description and experience and considers the possible place of the unconscious. The findings are discussed in relation to various philosophical theories relating to psychotherapy. The implications from this research for both trainee therapists and experienced therapists are the important and significant place of both personal therapy and clinical supervision. For training organisation, the implications are that they should ensure the trainees are supported as they develop a growing understanding of their place in the therapeutic relationship and an increasing awareness of where, as a therapist, they are responding from. In respect of self-disclosure as a therapeutic intervention, the findings imply the need for judicious caution, particularly in respect of ethical implications of non-maleficience and beneficience.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Del Loewenthal (d.loewenthal@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-19T14:54:16Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-19T15:38:35Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2010-01-19T15:38:35Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2006en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectDisclosureen
dc.subjectCounsellingen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectTherapisten
dc.subjectPhenomenologyen
dc.titleWhat, if anything, might you share with your client if something about their story touches your own?en
dc.typeThesisen
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