In what ways, if any, has your personal therapy contributed to your understanding of what happens in counselling/psychotherapy?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90000
Title:
In what ways, if any, has your personal therapy contributed to your understanding of what happens in counselling/psychotherapy?
Authors:
Lewington, Alexandra
Abstract:
The aim of this study is to find out what trainee counsellors/psychotherapists undergoing personal therapy have discovered about this particular experience. In order to achieve this, the researcher examined the existing research on this topic in terms of both quantitative and qualitative research material. This demonstrated that therapy ‘works’. However, it was more difficult to establish what makes it work. What emerged from an exploration of the theory suggest that it is the person of the therapist in terms of his/her experience that is the crucial factor. The researcher’s understanding of this term evolves with the progression of the study. Qualitative studies of experienced therapists undergoing therapy reveal the aspects of their therapists they found helpful/unhelpful. It was the researcher’s intention to make a contribution to those findings by revealing aspects of the relationship that had as yet remained unexplored. In order to achieve this she utilised a method that would allow her to explore participants’ ‘experience’ of undergoing personal therapy. The assumption was that the extent to which a trainee counsellor/psychotherapist was able to understand the process would be evidenced in their ability to communicate that process similarly to how an adult who has integrated their life experience is able to communicate their ‘story’. Thus a narrative method of inquiry was employed. 6 participants were interviewed and their data tape-recorded, transcribed and analysed. The researcher hoped that by allowing the participant to narrate his/her ‘story’ the essence of the experience would be captured. The findings reveal that the method gave the researcher a glimpse of the participant in the role of client. The extent to which that information can be used to determine the efficacy of the participant in the role of therapist is discussed
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/90000
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
UKCP Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLewington, Alexandraen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-19T14:39:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-19T14:39:01Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/90000-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study is to find out what trainee counsellors/psychotherapists undergoing personal therapy have discovered about this particular experience. In order to achieve this, the researcher examined the existing research on this topic in terms of both quantitative and qualitative research material. This demonstrated that therapy ‘works’. However, it was more difficult to establish what makes it work. What emerged from an exploration of the theory suggest that it is the person of the therapist in terms of his/her experience that is the crucial factor. The researcher’s understanding of this term evolves with the progression of the study. Qualitative studies of experienced therapists undergoing therapy reveal the aspects of their therapists they found helpful/unhelpful. It was the researcher’s intention to make a contribution to those findings by revealing aspects of the relationship that had as yet remained unexplored. In order to achieve this she utilised a method that would allow her to explore participants’ ‘experience’ of undergoing personal therapy. The assumption was that the extent to which a trainee counsellor/psychotherapist was able to understand the process would be evidenced in their ability to communicate that process similarly to how an adult who has integrated their life experience is able to communicate their ‘story’. Thus a narrative method of inquiry was employed. 6 participants were interviewed and their data tape-recorded, transcribed and analysed. The researcher hoped that by allowing the participant to narrate his/her ‘story’ the essence of the experience would be captured. The findings reveal that the method gave the researcher a glimpse of the participant in the role of client. The extent to which that information can be used to determine the efficacy of the participant in the role of therapist is discusseden
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dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2010-01-19T14:39:01Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
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dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectTraineeen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectCounsellingen
dc.subjectNarrativeen
dc.subjectExperienceen
dc.titleIn what ways, if any, has your personal therapy contributed to your understanding of what happens in counselling/psychotherapy?en
dc.typeThesisen
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