Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/84213
Title:
Work to be done? welfare reform from Blair to Brown
Authors:
Driver, Stephen
Abstract:
Welfare reform has been central to ‘New Labour’ politics since the mid-1990s. In government, Labour can, with some justification, take credit for getting Britain working and cutting poverty. But while employment continued to rise after 1997, rates of economic inactivity remained much the same. And since 2005, the battle against poverty has stalled. This article assesses the Brown government’s plans to reform the welfare state. These plans are leading to fresh political tensions within the Labour Party as the government seeks to extend its ‘employment first’ welfare policies by getting tougher on entitlements and extending the role of the private sector in delivering welfare to work. With the economic outlook deteriorating, and public spending under tighter reign, the outlook for Labour’s reforms looks uncertain. The buoyant labour market that sustained the government’s welfare-to-work programme – but which did little for the underlying rate of economic inactivity – has gone. After ten years of government, welfare reform is unfinished business for Labour under Prime Minister Gordon Brown.; Welfare reform has been central to ‘New Labour’ politics since the mid-1990s. In government, Labour can, with some justification, take credit for getting Britain working and cutting poverty. But while employment continued to rise after 1997, rates of economic inactivity remained much the same. And since 2005, the battle against poverty has stalled. This article assesses the Brown government's plans to reform the welfare state. These plans are leading to fresh political tensions within the Labour Party as the government seeks to extend its ‘employment first’ welfare policies by getting tougher on entitlements and extending the role of the private sector in delivering welfare-to-work. With the economic outlook deteriorating, and public spending under tighter reign, the outlook for Labour's reforms looks uncertain. The buoyant labour market that sustained the government's welfare-to-work programme – but which did little for the underlying rate of economic inactivity – has gone. After 10 years of government, welfare reform is unfinished business for Labour under Prime Minister Gordon Brown.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Policy Studies
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01442870802576108
DOI:
10.1080/01442870802576108
Language:
en
ISSN:
0144-2872; 1470-1006
Appears in Collections:
Department of Social Sciences Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDriver, Stephenen
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-14T07:37:44Z-
dc.date.available2009-10-14T07:37:44Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.issn0144-2872-
dc.identifier.issn1470-1006-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01442870802576108-
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01442870802576108-
dc.description.abstractWelfare reform has been central to ‘New Labour’ politics since the mid-1990s. In government, Labour can, with some justification, take credit for getting Britain working and cutting poverty. But while employment continued to rise after 1997, rates of economic inactivity remained much the same. And since 2005, the battle against poverty has stalled. This article assesses the Brown government’s plans to reform the welfare state. These plans are leading to fresh political tensions within the Labour Party as the government seeks to extend its ‘employment first’ welfare policies by getting tougher on entitlements and extending the role of the private sector in delivering welfare to work. With the economic outlook deteriorating, and public spending under tighter reign, the outlook for Labour’s reforms looks uncertain. The buoyant labour market that sustained the government’s welfare-to-work programme – but which did little for the underlying rate of economic inactivity – has gone. After ten years of government, welfare reform is unfinished business for Labour under Prime Minister Gordon Brown.en
dc.description.abstractWelfare reform has been central to ‘New Labour’ politics since the mid-1990s. In government, Labour can, with some justification, take credit for getting Britain working and cutting poverty. But while employment continued to rise after 1997, rates of economic inactivity remained much the same. And since 2005, the battle against poverty has stalled. This article assesses the Brown government's plans to reform the welfare state. These plans are leading to fresh political tensions within the Labour Party as the government seeks to extend its ‘employment first’ welfare policies by getting tougher on entitlements and extending the role of the private sector in delivering welfare-to-work. With the economic outlook deteriorating, and public spending under tighter reign, the outlook for Labour's reforms looks uncertain. The buoyant labour market that sustained the government's welfare-to-work programme – but which did little for the underlying rate of economic inactivity – has gone. After 10 years of government, welfare reform is unfinished business for Labour under Prime Minister Gordon Brown.-
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Stephen Driver (s.driver@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2009-10-13T19:07:27Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2009-10-14T07:37:43Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2009-10-14T07:37:44Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2009-02en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.subjectNew Labouren
dc.subjectwelfare reformen
dc.titleWork to be done? welfare reform from Blair to Brownen
dc.identifier.journalPolicy Studiesen
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