Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/81773
Title:
In remembrance: The Flanders poppy
Authors:
Iles, Jennifer
Abstract:
Intricately bound with both national and local acts of commemoration for the war dead is the symbol of the red Flanders poppy. Adopted after the First World War as the official emblem of the Royal British Legion, which today is the nation's de facto custodian of remembrance, the poppy continues to encapsulate a conglomerate of ideas and strong sentiments. This article, which is partly based on ethnographic fieldwork carried out around Ypres, Belgium, the Somme region in France, and in London, seeks to explore the various factors that have enabled the poppy to become a lasting and universally respected symbol of remembrance for the war dead. It will also examine its current role in the rituals of remembrance and consider some of the debates and controversies that surround its cluster of values and continuing symbolic power.
Publisher:
Routledge
Journal:
Mortality
Issue Date:
Aug-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/81773
DOI:
10.1080/13576270802181640
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
13576275; 14699885
Appears in Collections:
Department of Social Sciences Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIles, Jennifer-
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-21T07:48:22Z-
dc.date.available2009-09-21T07:48:22Z-
dc.date.issued2008-08-
dc.identifier.issn13576275-
dc.identifier.issn14699885-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13576270802181640-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/81773-
dc.description.abstractIntricately bound with both national and local acts of commemoration for the war dead is the symbol of the red Flanders poppy. Adopted after the First World War as the official emblem of the Royal British Legion, which today is the nation's de facto custodian of remembrance, the poppy continues to encapsulate a conglomerate of ideas and strong sentiments. This article, which is partly based on ethnographic fieldwork carried out around Ypres, Belgium, the Somme region in France, and in London, seeks to explore the various factors that have enabled the poppy to become a lasting and universally respected symbol of remembrance for the war dead. It will also examine its current role in the rituals of remembrance and consider some of the debates and controversies that surround its cluster of values and continuing symbolic power.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Jennifer Iles (j.iles@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2009-09-18T12:31:23Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2009-09-21T07:48:21Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2009-09-21T07:48:22Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2008-08en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.subjectRemembrance, Flanders poppy, Royal British Legion, Poppy Appeal, blood sacrificeen
dc.titleIn remembrance: The Flanders poppyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMortalityen
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