Dietary restriction, cardiac autonomic regulation and stress reactivity in bulimic women.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/71799
Title:
Dietary restriction, cardiac autonomic regulation and stress reactivity in bulimic women.
Authors:
Vogele, Claus; Hilbert, A.; Tuschen-Caffier, B.
Abstract:
Recent findings suggest sympathetic inhibition during dietary restriction as opposed to increased sympathetic activity during re-feeding. The present study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation and stress reactivity in relation to biochemical markers of dietary restriction status in women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa. We predicted that bulimic individuals (BN) with a biochemical profile indicating dietary restriction exhibit reduced cardiac sympathetic and/or increased vagal activity. We also hypothesized, that BN with a biochemical profile within a normal range (i.e. currently not dieting or malnourished) would show heart rate variability responses (HRV) and reactivity to mental stress indicating increased sympathetic activation compared with non-eating disordered controls. Seventeen female volunteers diagnosed with bulimia nervosa were categorized according to their serum profile (glucose, pre-albumin, IGF-1, TSH, leptin) into currently fasting versus non-fasting and compared with 16 non-eating disordered controls matched for age and BMI. Spectral components of HRV were calculated on heart rate data from resting and mental stress periods (standardized achievement challenge) using autoregressive analysis. Compared to non-fasting BN and controls, fasting BN showed increased vagal and decreased sympathetic modulation during both resting and recovery periods. Cardiac autonomic regulation was not impaired in response to mental challenge. No differences could be found between non-fasting BN and controls. The results confirm the notion of cardiac sympathetic inhibition and vagal dominance during dietary restriction and suggest the specificity of starvation related biochemical changes for cardiac autonomic control. The results are discussed in terms of the higher incidence in cardiac complications in these patients.
Citation:
Dietary restriction, cardiac autonomic regulation and stress reactivity in bulimic women. 2009: Physiol. Behav.
Journal:
Physiology & behavior
Issue Date:
2-Jun-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/71799
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2009.05.018
PubMed ID:
19497332
Type:
Article
Language:
null
Appears in Collections:
Department of Life Sciences Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVogele, Claus-
dc.contributor.authorHilbert, A.-
dc.contributor.authorTuschen-Caffier, B.-
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-29T10:09:47Z-
dc.date.available2009-06-29T10:09:47Z-
dc.date.issued2009-06-02-
dc.identifier.citationDietary restriction, cardiac autonomic regulation and stress reactivity in bulimic women. 2009: Physiol. Behav.en
dc.identifier.pmid19497332-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.physbeh.2009.05.018-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/71799-
dc.description.abstractRecent findings suggest sympathetic inhibition during dietary restriction as opposed to increased sympathetic activity during re-feeding. The present study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation and stress reactivity in relation to biochemical markers of dietary restriction status in women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa. We predicted that bulimic individuals (BN) with a biochemical profile indicating dietary restriction exhibit reduced cardiac sympathetic and/or increased vagal activity. We also hypothesized, that BN with a biochemical profile within a normal range (i.e. currently not dieting or malnourished) would show heart rate variability responses (HRV) and reactivity to mental stress indicating increased sympathetic activation compared with non-eating disordered controls. Seventeen female volunteers diagnosed with bulimia nervosa were categorized according to their serum profile (glucose, pre-albumin, IGF-1, TSH, leptin) into currently fasting versus non-fasting and compared with 16 non-eating disordered controls matched for age and BMI. Spectral components of HRV were calculated on heart rate data from resting and mental stress periods (standardized achievement challenge) using autoregressive analysis. Compared to non-fasting BN and controls, fasting BN showed increased vagal and decreased sympathetic modulation during both resting and recovery periods. Cardiac autonomic regulation was not impaired in response to mental challenge. No differences could be found between non-fasting BN and controls. The results confirm the notion of cardiac sympathetic inhibition and vagal dominance during dietary restriction and suggest the specificity of starvation related biochemical changes for cardiac autonomic control. The results are discussed in terms of the higher incidence in cardiac complications in these patients.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Pat Simons (p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2009-06-29T09:18:54Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2009-06-29T10:09:47Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2009-06-29T10:09:47Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2009-06-02en
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isonullen
dc.titleDietary restriction, cardiac autonomic regulation and stress reactivity in bulimic women.-
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPhysiology & behavioren

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