Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/71023
Title:
Attitudes to making art in the primary school
Authors:
Watts, Robert
Abstract:
Recent research suggests that the majority of primary school teachers in the UK believe that the purpose of teaching art and design is to develop skills associated with creativity, communication and expression. This article is based on research into the attitudes held by primary school pupils towards making art. The reflective nature of many of the responses to the survey provides persuasive evidence of young children’s capacity for absorbing relatively complex ideas, which in turn has implications for teacher expectations of pupil learning in art and design.
Citation:
Watts, R. (2005) Attitudes to Making Art in the Primary School, International Journal of Art and Design Education, 24.3 pp.243-253
Publisher:
Blackwell Publishing
Journal:
International Journal of Art and Design Education
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-8070.2005.00447.x
DOI:
10.1111/j.1476-8070.2005.00447.x
Additional Links:
http://www.artandeducation.co.uk/pdfs/research/Attitudes_to_making_art_in_the_primary_school.pdf
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1476-8062
Appears in Collections:
Department of Education Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWatts, Robert-
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-19T15:16:46Z-
dc.date.available2009-06-19T15:16:46Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationWatts, R. (2005) Attitudes to Making Art in the Primary School, International Journal of Art and Design Education, 24.3 pp.243-253en
dc.identifier.issn1476-8062-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1476-8070.2005.00447.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-8070.2005.00447.x-
dc.description.abstractRecent research suggests that the majority of primary school teachers in the UK believe that the purpose of teaching art and design is to develop skills associated with creativity, communication and expression. This article is based on research into the attitudes held by primary school pupils towards making art. The reflective nature of many of the responses to the survey provides persuasive evidence of young children’s capacity for absorbing relatively complex ideas, which in turn has implications for teacher expectations of pupil learning in art and design.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Robert Watts (r.watts@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2009-06-19T14:20:19Z No. of bitstreams: 1 R Watts Attitudes to Making Art in the Primary School.pdf: 190693 bytes, checksum: 09f1e7321291a5173f77b66781937455 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2009-06-19T15:16:45Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 R Watts Attitudes to Making Art in the Primary School.pdf: 190693 bytes, checksum: 09f1e7321291a5173f77b66781937455 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2009-06-19T15:16:46Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 R Watts Attitudes to Making Art in the Primary School.pdf: 190693 bytes, checksum: 09f1e7321291a5173f77b66781937455 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2005en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.artandeducation.co.uk/pdfs/research/Attitudes_to_making_art_in_the_primary_school.pdfen
dc.titleAttitudes to making art in the primary schoolen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Art and Design Educationen
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