Psychological processing of transplantation in lung recipients: A quantitative study of organ integration and the relationship to the donor

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/69501
Title:
Psychological processing of transplantation in lung recipients: A quantitative study of organ integration and the relationship to the donor
Authors:
Goetzmann, Lutz; Irani, S.; Moser, Karin; Schwegler, K.; Stamm, M.; Spindler, A.; Buddeberg, C.; Schmid, C.; Boehler, A.; Klaghofer, R.
Abstract:
Objectives Lung recipients undergo a complex psychological process, including organ integration and processing of attitudes towards the organ donor. Design Seventy-six lung recipients were asked to participate in a cross-sectional questionnaire study on the psychological processing of lung transplants. Methods The questionnaire consisted of statements describing aspects of organ integration and the patient's relationship with the donor. Furthermore, chronic stress/psychological distress (Screening Scale of the Trier Inventory; Symptom Checklist SCL-K-9) and the emotional effects of transplantation/immunosuppression (Transplant Effects Questionnaire; Medication Experience Scale for Immunosuppressants) were assessed. Results In general, lung recipients perceive the transplant as part of themselves (97.4%) and not as a foreign object (90%). One-third of patients still have frequent thoughts about the donor, whilst the majority (80.3%) do not believe that they have adopted the donor's characteristic traits. Factor analysis reveals the two-dimensional structure of the questionnaire items ‘organ integration’ (factor 1) and ‘relationship to the donor’ (factor 2). Poor organ integration predicts low adherence, low disclosure and high feelings of guilt, whilst a close donor relationship predicts chronic stress and psychological distress. Conclusions Poor organ integration and a close relationship to the donor should be borne in mind in psychosocial treatment regarding the patient's adherence behaviour and psychological distress.
Journal:
British Journal of Health Psychology
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/69501
DOI:
10.1348/135910708X399447
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1359107X; 00000000
Appears in Collections:
Department of Psychology Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGoetzmann, Lutz-
dc.contributor.authorIrani, S.-
dc.contributor.authorMoser, Karin-
dc.contributor.authorSchwegler, K.-
dc.contributor.authorStamm, M.-
dc.contributor.authorSpindler, A.-
dc.contributor.authorBuddeberg, C.-
dc.contributor.authorSchmid, C.-
dc.contributor.authorBoehler, A.-
dc.contributor.authorKlaghofer, R.-
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-01T12:57:59Z-
dc.date.available2009-06-01T12:57:59Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.issn1359107X-
dc.identifier.issn00000000-
dc.identifier.doi10.1348/135910708X399447-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/69501-
dc.description.abstractObjectives Lung recipients undergo a complex psychological process, including organ integration and processing of attitudes towards the organ donor. Design Seventy-six lung recipients were asked to participate in a cross-sectional questionnaire study on the psychological processing of lung transplants. Methods The questionnaire consisted of statements describing aspects of organ integration and the patient's relationship with the donor. Furthermore, chronic stress/psychological distress (Screening Scale of the Trier Inventory; Symptom Checklist SCL-K-9) and the emotional effects of transplantation/immunosuppression (Transplant Effects Questionnaire; Medication Experience Scale for Immunosuppressants) were assessed. Results In general, lung recipients perceive the transplant as part of themselves (97.4%) and not as a foreign object (90%). One-third of patients still have frequent thoughts about the donor, whilst the majority (80.3%) do not believe that they have adopted the donor's characteristic traits. Factor analysis reveals the two-dimensional structure of the questionnaire items ‘organ integration’ (factor 1) and ‘relationship to the donor’ (factor 2). Poor organ integration predicts low adherence, low disclosure and high feelings of guilt, whilst a close donor relationship predicts chronic stress and psychological distress. Conclusions Poor organ integration and a close relationship to the donor should be borne in mind in psychosocial treatment regarding the patient's adherence behaviour and psychological distress.en
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dc.language.isoenen
dc.titlePsychological processing of transplantation in lung recipients: A quantitative study of organ integration and the relationship to the donoren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Health Psychologyen
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