It’s all in the past: Deconstructing the temporal Doppler effect

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/620053
Title:
It’s all in the past: Deconstructing the temporal Doppler effect
Authors:
Aksentijevic, Aleksandar; Gudnyson Treider, John Melvin
Abstract:
A recent study reported an asymmetry between subjective estimates of future and past distances with passive estimation and virtual movement. The temporal Doppler effect refers to the contraction of future distance judgments relative to past ones. We aimed to replicate the effect using real and imagined motion in both directions as well as different temporal perspectives. To avoid the problem of subjective anchoring, we compared real- and imagined-, ego- and time-moving conditions to a control group. Generally, Doppler-like distortion was only observed in conditions in which the distance between the participant and a frontal target increased. No effects of temporal perspective were observed. The “past-directed temporal Doppler effect” presents a challenge for the current theories of temporal cognition by demonstrating absence of psychological movement into the future. The effect could open new avenues in memory research and serve as a starting point in a systematic examination of how the humans construct future.
Affiliation:
University of Roehampton
Citation:
Aleksandar Aksentijevic, John Melvin Gudnyson Treider, It’s all in the past: Deconstructing the temporal Doppler effect, Cognition, 155, October 2016, pp.135-145, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2016.07.001
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Cognition
Issue Date:
7-Jul-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/620053
DOI:
10.1016/j.cognition.2016.07.001
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2016.07.001
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Accepted Date: 01/07/2016; Version: Author Manuscript / Post-Print; Exceptions: None
ISSN:
0010-0277
Appears in Collections:
Department of Psychology Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAksentijevic, Aleksandaren
dc.contributor.authorGudnyson Treider, John Melvinen
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-13T11:29:49Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-13T11:29:49Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-07-
dc.identifier.citationAleksandar Aksentijevic, John Melvin Gudnyson Treider, It’s all in the past: Deconstructing the temporal Doppler effect, Cognition, 155, October 2016, pp.135-145, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2016.07.001en
dc.identifier.issn0010-0277-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cognition.2016.07.001-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/620053-
dc.descriptionAccepted Date: 01/07/2016; Version: Author Manuscript / Post-Print; Exceptions: Noneen
dc.description.abstractA recent study reported an asymmetry between subjective estimates of future and past distances with passive estimation and virtual movement. The temporal Doppler effect refers to the contraction of future distance judgments relative to past ones. We aimed to replicate the effect using real and imagined motion in both directions as well as different temporal perspectives. To avoid the problem of subjective anchoring, we compared real- and imagined-, ego- and time-moving conditions to a control group. Generally, Doppler-like distortion was only observed in conditions in which the distance between the participant and a frontal target increased. No effects of temporal perspective were observed. The “past-directed temporal Doppler effect” presents a challenge for the current theories of temporal cognition by demonstrating absence of psychological movement into the future. The effect could open new avenues in memory research and serve as a starting point in a systematic examination of how the humans construct future.en
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dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Camilla Griffiths (camilla.griffiths@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2016-09-13T11:29:48Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 Aksentijevic Cognition final draft.pdf: 608861 bytes, checksum: 1023f5a8673d479c827114648e0957d7 (MD5) license_rdf: 9 bytes, checksum: 42dd12a06de379d3ffa39b67dc9c7aff (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-09-13T11:29:49Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 Aksentijevic Cognition final draft.pdf: 608861 bytes, checksum: 1023f5a8673d479c827114648e0957d7 (MD5) license_rdf: 9 bytes, checksum: 42dd12a06de379d3ffa39b67dc9c7aff (MD5) Previous issue date: 2016-07-07en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2016.07.001en
dc.rightsAn error occurred on the license name.*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.rights.uriAn error occurred getting the license - uri.*
dc.titleIt’s all in the past: Deconstructing the temporal Doppler effecten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Roehamptonen
dc.identifier.journalCognitionen
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