Pretty past it? Interrogating the post-feminist makeover of ageing, style, and fashion

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/617245
Title:
Pretty past it? Interrogating the post-feminist makeover of ageing, style, and fashion
Authors:
Jermyn, Deborah
Abstract:
From the “Leading Ladies” advertising campaign for UK high-street stalwart Marks and Spencer, to Charlotte Rampling becoming the face of NARS cosmetics at sixty-eight in 2014, and the delight that meets select older women stars such as Helen Mirren on the red carpet in the women’s magazine market, it appears that the fashion, beauty and celebrity industries of late have opened their arms to embrace stylish “women of a certain age” to an unprecedented degree. This article scrutinises the reception and complexities that lie at the core of this seeming cultural shift which, at first glance, might be positively construed to demonstrate that at last the disenfranchisement and invisibility endured by older women in these industries—which are central to upholding wider social hierarchies about which women “matter”—have been dented. Examining recent documentaries and advertising campaigns, I ask: what is at stake in the decision to co-opt “old women” into the (young) marketplace of style and fashion, and in the seeming willingness by many audiences to embrace texts featuring older women as sartorial mavens? The zeitgeist described here arguably underlines how the directive to enact “self-surveillance, monitoring and discipline” (Rosalind Gill 2007) around one’s appearance increasingly incorporates an older subject/consumer, and evidences how coercion to submit to “makeover” culture seemingly never ends. For these reasons, I argue, it is imperative that feminist media studies’ critique of the neoliberal, post-feminist climate addresses the widespread neglect of older women in extant cultural analyses, and turns its attention now to the implications of this shift.
Affiliation:
University of Roehampton
Citation:
Pretty past it? Interrogating the post-feminist makeover of ageing, style, and fashion 2016, 16 (4):573 Feminist Media Studies
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Feminist Media Studies
Issue Date:
21-Jun-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/617245
DOI:
10.1080/14680777.2016.1193371
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14680777.2016.1193371
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Accepted Date: November 2015; Version: Author Manuscript / Post-Print; Exceptions: None
ISSN:
1468-0777; 1471-5902
Appears in Collections:
Department of Media, Culture and Language Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJermyn, Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-19T13:24:38Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-19T13:24:38Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-21-
dc.identifier.citationPretty past it? Interrogating the post-feminist makeover of ageing, style, and fashion 2016, 16 (4):573 Feminist Media Studiesen
dc.identifier.issn1468-0777-
dc.identifier.issn1471-5902-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14680777.2016.1193371-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/617245-
dc.descriptionAccepted Date: November 2015; Version: Author Manuscript / Post-Print; Exceptions: Noneen
dc.description.abstractFrom the “Leading Ladies” advertising campaign for UK high-street stalwart Marks and Spencer, to Charlotte Rampling becoming the face of NARS cosmetics at sixty-eight in 2014, and the delight that meets select older women stars such as Helen Mirren on the red carpet in the women’s magazine market, it appears that the fashion, beauty and celebrity industries of late have opened their arms to embrace stylish “women of a certain age” to an unprecedented degree. This article scrutinises the reception and complexities that lie at the core of this seeming cultural shift which, at first glance, might be positively construed to demonstrate that at last the disenfranchisement and invisibility endured by older women in these industries—which are central to upholding wider social hierarchies about which women “matter”—have been dented. Examining recent documentaries and advertising campaigns, I ask: what is at stake in the decision to co-opt “old women” into the (young) marketplace of style and fashion, and in the seeming willingness by many audiences to embrace texts featuring older women as sartorial mavens? The zeitgeist described here arguably underlines how the directive to enact “self-surveillance, monitoring and discipline” (Rosalind Gill 2007) around one’s appearance increasingly incorporates an older subject/consumer, and evidences how coercion to submit to “makeover” culture seemingly never ends. For these reasons, I argue, it is imperative that feminist media studies’ critique of the neoliberal, post-feminist climate addresses the widespread neglect of older women in extant cultural analyses, and turns its attention now to the implications of this shift.en
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dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Camilla Griffiths (camilla.griffiths@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2016-07-19T13:24:36Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Jermyn_Pretty past it.pdf: 469521 bytes, checksum: abfe61e85a388fdbb4be29cd020e66a0 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-07-19T13:24:38Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Jermyn_Pretty past it.pdf: 469521 bytes, checksum: abfe61e85a388fdbb4be29cd020e66a0 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2016-06-21en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14680777.2016.1193371en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Feminist Media Studiesen
dc.titlePretty past it? Interrogating the post-feminist makeover of ageing, style, and fashionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Roehamptonen
dc.identifier.journalFeminist Media Studiesen
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