Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/615661
Title:
After Friendship
Authors:
Healy, Mary
Abstract:
The loss of friendship can be a frequent occurrence for children as they explore their social worlds and navigate their way through the demands of particular relationships. Given that friendship is a relationship of special regard, and associated with a particular partiality to our friends, the ending of friendship and the subsequent interactions between former friends, can be difficult areas for schools to deal with. Whilst there has been considerable research on the formation and maintenance of friendship, a consideration of what happens after friendship has had surprisingly limited attention. Much of our current understanding of issues on moral behaviour fails to fully address the positioning of former friends in our moral thinking particularly as regards matters arising from the priority of attachment. Recent empirical research seems to indicate that the memory of prior encounters has a far greater influence on future reciprocal exchanges (such as those found in friendship) than previously accepted. This paper considers suggests that this view of memory can be played out in two contrasting ways. First, a prudential view suggests that as our former friends were previously given access to our intimate secrets and confidences, self-interest would seem to indicate that we treat them well. Secondly, a residual duties view suggests that some obligations remain after the friendship has ended based on the history of the relationship. Finally, I then draw out some of the implications this may have for schools and the education of children.
Affiliation:
University of Roehampton
Citation:
After Friendship 2016 Journal of Philosophy of Education
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Journal of Philosophy of Education
Issue Date:
Jun-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/615661
DOI:
10.1111/1467-9752.12191
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1467-9752.12191
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Accepted Date: 28/03/2016; Version: Author Manuscript / Post-Print; Exceptions: None
ISSN:
03098249
Appears in Collections:
Department of Education Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealy, Maryen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-06T15:26:02Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-06T15:26:02Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-
dc.identifier.citationAfter Friendship 2016 Journal of Philosophy of Educationen
dc.identifier.issn03098249-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1467-9752.12191-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/615661-
dc.descriptionAccepted Date: 28/03/2016; Version: Author Manuscript / Post-Print; Exceptions: Noneen
dc.description.abstractThe loss of friendship can be a frequent occurrence for children as they explore their social worlds and navigate their way through the demands of particular relationships. Given that friendship is a relationship of special regard, and associated with a particular partiality to our friends, the ending of friendship and the subsequent interactions between former friends, can be difficult areas for schools to deal with. Whilst there has been considerable research on the formation and maintenance of friendship, a consideration of what happens after friendship has had surprisingly limited attention. Much of our current understanding of issues on moral behaviour fails to fully address the positioning of former friends in our moral thinking particularly as regards matters arising from the priority of attachment. Recent empirical research seems to indicate that the memory of prior encounters has a far greater influence on future reciprocal exchanges (such as those found in friendship) than previously accepted. This paper considers suggests that this view of memory can be played out in two contrasting ways. First, a prudential view suggests that as our former friends were previously given access to our intimate secrets and confidences, self-interest would seem to indicate that we treat them well. Secondly, a residual duties view suggests that some obligations remain after the friendship has ended based on the history of the relationship. Finally, I then draw out some of the implications this may have for schools and the education of children.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Camilla Griffiths (camilla.griffiths@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2016-07-06T15:25:42Z No. of bitstreams: 1 After Friendship.pdf: 180824 bytes, checksum: d5ab227207237574db26253bdf99d53b (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Camilla Griffiths (camilla.griffiths@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2016-07-06T15:26:00Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 After Friendship.pdf: 180824 bytes, checksum: d5ab227207237574db26253bdf99d53b (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-07-06T15:26:02Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 After Friendship.pdf: 180824 bytes, checksum: d5ab227207237574db26253bdf99d53b (MD5) Previous issue date: 2016-06en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1467-9752.12191en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Philosophy of Educationen
dc.titleAfter Friendshipen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Roehamptonen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Philosophy of Educationen
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