Terrestrial movement energetics: current knowledge and its application to the optimising animal

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/610714
Title:
Terrestrial movement energetics: current knowledge and its application to the optimising animal
Authors:
Halsey, Lewis G. ( 0000-0002-0786-7585 )
Abstract:
The energetic cost of locomotion can be a substantial proportion of an animal’s daily energy budget and thus key to its ecology. Studies on myriad species have added to our knowledge about the general cost of animal movement, including the effects of variations in the environment such as terrain angle. However, further such studies might provide diminishing returns on the development of a deeper understanding of how animals trade-off the cost of movement with other energy costs, and other ecological currencies such as time. Here, I propose the ‘individual energy landscape’ as an approach to conceptualising the choices facing the optimising animal. In this Commentary, first I outline previous broad findings about animal walking and running locomotion, focusing in particular on the use of net cost of transport as a metric of comparison between species, and then considering the effects of environmental perturbations and other extrinsic factors on movement costs. I then introduce and explore the idea that these factors combine with the behaviour of the animal in seeking short-term optimality to create that animal’s individual energy landscape – the result of the geographical landscape and environmental factors combined with the animal’s selected trade- offs. Considering an animal’s locomotion energy expenditure within this context enables hard-won empirical data on transport costs to be applied to questions about how an animal can and does move through its environment to maximise its fitness, and the relative importance, or otherwise, of locomotion energy economy.
Affiliation:
University of Roehampton
Citation:
Terrestrial movement energetics: current knowledge and its application to the optimising animal 2016, 219 (10):1424 The Journal of Experimental Biology
Publisher:
The Company of Biologists
Journal:
The Journal of Experimental Biology
Issue Date:
18-May-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/610714
DOI:
10.1242/jeb.133256
Additional Links:
http://jeb.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jeb.133256
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Accepted Date: 14/03/2016; Version: Publisher; Exceptions: None
ISSN:
0022-0949; 1477-9145
Appears in Collections:
Department of Life Sciences Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHalsey, Lewis G.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-25T14:01:21Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-25T14:01:21Zen
dc.date.issued2016-05-18en
dc.identifier.citationTerrestrial movement energetics: current knowledge and its application to the optimising animal 2016, 219 (10):1424 The Journal of Experimental Biologyen
dc.identifier.issn0022-0949en
dc.identifier.issn1477-9145en
dc.identifier.doi10.1242/jeb.133256en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/610714en
dc.descriptionAccepted Date: 14/03/2016; Version: Publisher; Exceptions: Noneen
dc.description.abstractThe energetic cost of locomotion can be a substantial proportion of an animal’s daily energy budget and thus key to its ecology. Studies on myriad species have added to our knowledge about the general cost of animal movement, including the effects of variations in the environment such as terrain angle. However, further such studies might provide diminishing returns on the development of a deeper understanding of how animals trade-off the cost of movement with other energy costs, and other ecological currencies such as time. Here, I propose the ‘individual energy landscape’ as an approach to conceptualising the choices facing the optimising animal. In this Commentary, first I outline previous broad findings about animal walking and running locomotion, focusing in particular on the use of net cost of transport as a metric of comparison between species, and then considering the effects of environmental perturbations and other extrinsic factors on movement costs. I then introduce and explore the idea that these factors combine with the behaviour of the animal in seeking short-term optimality to create that animal’s individual energy landscape – the result of the geographical landscape and environmental factors combined with the animal’s selected trade- offs. Considering an animal’s locomotion energy expenditure within this context enables hard-won empirical data on transport costs to be applied to questions about how an animal can and does move through its environment to maximise its fitness, and the relative importance, or otherwise, of locomotion energy economy.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Anne Pietsch (a.pietsch@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2016-05-24T15:16:21Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Halsey (2016) Movement E - the optimising animal.pdf: 650171 bytes, checksum: 8affaef495090a35edd420f139b9c742 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Anne Pietsch (a.pietsch@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2016-05-25T14:01:21Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Halsey (2016) Movement E - the optimising animal.pdf: 650171 bytes, checksum: 8affaef495090a35edd420f139b9c742 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-25T14:01:21Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Halsey (2016) Movement E - the optimising animal.pdf: 650171 bytes, checksum: 8affaef495090a35edd420f139b9c742 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2016-05-18en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Company of Biologistsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://jeb.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jeb.133256en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of Experimental Biologyen
dc.titleTerrestrial movement energetics: current knowledge and its application to the optimising animalen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Roehamptonen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Experimental Biologyen
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