Performing Sufi Living in Contemporary Turkey

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/608674
Title:
Performing Sufi Living in Contemporary Turkey
Authors:
Çizmeci, Hasret Esra
Abstract:
In 1925, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the founder of the Turkish Republic, at the beginning of the Republican Era of Turkey, passed a series of decrees that prohibited the production and maintenance of Sufi lodges in Turkey and the practices of Sufi şeyhs and dervishes. This legal act was part of Atatürk’s social reforms that were designed to convert the newly found Republic of Turkey into a secular, modern state. Atatürk believed that Sufi dervish lodges should be closed immediately in order to transform the long-existing religious Ottoman culture into a rapidly evolving intellectual culture educated through Western scientific knowledge. This project examines how, despite legal restrictions prohibiting Sufi lodge production, devotees continue to create space for their devotional living in present-day Turkey. Through extensive field research in Sufi communities, this project investigates how Sufi religious practices are maintained, adapted, mobilized, and empowered through embodied acts of Sufi followers. Using Dwight Conquergood’s concept of “dialogic” performance, I analyze the ritual and everyday life experience of Sufi devotees in a variety of temporary and permanent sacred spaces through my coperformative witnessing. I argue in this study that the multifaceted urban Sufi devotional living in contemporary Turkey may be discerned most vividly by analysis of production of Sufi sacred spaces, the performance of Sufi rituals, and embodiment of Sufi beliefs and values in everyday life in a variety of urban commercial sites such as museums and cultural centers and private houses and apartment buildings converted to Sufi lodges. With their embodied acts, devotees revive, reformulate, expand, and mobilize Sufism as a way of living that is a synthesis of secular and religious values of the Turkish state.
Advisors:
Abrams, Josh; Greenhalgh, Susanne; Szeman, Ioana
Citation:
Çizmeci, E., 2013. Sufi Ceremonies in Private and Public. In Performing Religion in Public (pp. 179-193). Palgrave Macmillan UK.
Publisher:
Roehampton University
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/608674
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Sponsors:
Roehampton University Sacred Herat Scholarship
Appears in Collections:
PhD Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorAbrams, Joshen
dc.contributor.advisorGreenhalgh, Susanneen
dc.contributor.advisorSzeman, Ioanaen
dc.contributor.authorÇizmeci, Hasret Esraen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-09T11:11:03Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-09T11:11:03Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationÇizmeci, E., 2013. Sufi Ceremonies in Private and Public. In Performing Religion in Public (pp. 179-193). Palgrave Macmillan UK.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/608674en
dc.description.abstractIn 1925, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the founder of the Turkish Republic, at the beginning of the Republican Era of Turkey, passed a series of decrees that prohibited the production and maintenance of Sufi lodges in Turkey and the practices of Sufi şeyhs and dervishes. This legal act was part of Atatürk’s social reforms that were designed to convert the newly found Republic of Turkey into a secular, modern state. Atatürk believed that Sufi dervish lodges should be closed immediately in order to transform the long-existing religious Ottoman culture into a rapidly evolving intellectual culture educated through Western scientific knowledge. This project examines how, despite legal restrictions prohibiting Sufi lodge production, devotees continue to create space for their devotional living in present-day Turkey. Through extensive field research in Sufi communities, this project investigates how Sufi religious practices are maintained, adapted, mobilized, and empowered through embodied acts of Sufi followers. Using Dwight Conquergood’s concept of “dialogic” performance, I analyze the ritual and everyday life experience of Sufi devotees in a variety of temporary and permanent sacred spaces through my coperformative witnessing. I argue in this study that the multifaceted urban Sufi devotional living in contemporary Turkey may be discerned most vividly by analysis of production of Sufi sacred spaces, the performance of Sufi rituals, and embodiment of Sufi beliefs and values in everyday life in a variety of urban commercial sites such as museums and cultural centers and private houses and apartment buildings converted to Sufi lodges. With their embodied acts, devotees revive, reformulate, expand, and mobilize Sufism as a way of living that is a synthesis of secular and religious values of the Turkish state.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Anne Pietsch (a.pietsch@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2016-05-09T11:07:19Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Cizmeci Esra.pdf: 1637267 bytes, checksum: ed8f4ba09bfa4b65453e5f3b2f95a24a (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Anne Pietsch (a.pietsch@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2016-05-09T11:11:00Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Cizmeci Esra.pdf: 1637267 bytes, checksum: ed8f4ba09bfa4b65453e5f3b2f95a24a (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-09T11:11:03Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Cizmeci Esra.pdf: 1637267 bytes, checksum: ed8f4ba09bfa4b65453e5f3b2f95a24a (MD5) Previous issue date: 2015en
dc.description.sponsorshipRoehampton University Sacred Herat Scholarshipen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoehampton Universityen
dc.subjectSufismen
dc.titlePerforming Sufi Living in Contemporary Turkeyen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.publisher.departmentDepartment of Drama, Theatre and Performanceen
dc.rights.embargodate2016-09-22en
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen
dc.rights.embargoreasonRequested by student for period of 24 months from submission date.en
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
All Items in RURR are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.