PreSMA stimulation changes task-free functional connectivity in the fronto-basal-ganglia that correlates with response inhibition efficiency

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/608487
Title:
PreSMA stimulation changes task-free functional connectivity in the fronto-basal-ganglia that correlates with response inhibition efficiency
Authors:
Xu, Benjamin; Sandrini, Marco; Wang, Wen-Tung; Smith, Jason F.; Sarlls, Joelle E.; Awosika, Oluwole; Butman, John A.; Horwitz, Barry; Cohen, Leonardo G.
Abstract:
Previous work using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) demonstrated that the right presupplementary motor area (preSMA), a node in the fronto-basal-ganglia network, is critical for response inhibition. However, TMS influences interconnected regions, raising the possibility of a link between the preSMA activity and the functional connectivity within the network. To understand this relationship, we applied single-pulse TMS to the right preSMA during functional magnetic resonance imaging when the subjects were at rest to examine changes in neural activity and functional connectivity within the network in relation to the efficiency of response inhibition evaluated with a stop-signal task. The results showed that preSMA-TMS increased activation in the right inferior-frontal cortex (rIFC) and basal ganglia and modulated their task-free functional connectivity. Both the TMS-induced changes in the basal-ganglia activation and the functional connectivity between rIFC and left striatum, and of the overall network correlated with the efficiency of response inhibition and with the white-matter microstructure along the preSMA–rIFC pathway. These results suggest that the task-free functional and structural connectivity between the rIFCop and basal ganglia are critical to the efficiency of response inhibition.
Affiliation:
Human Cortical Physiology and Neurorehabilitation Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health; Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences; University of Maryland; Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health; NIH MRI Research Facility, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health; Section on Brain Imaging and Modeling, National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health
Citation:
PreSMA stimulation changes task-free functional connectivity in the fronto-basal-ganglia that correlates with response inhibition efficiency 2016 Human Brain Mapping
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Human Brain Mapping
Issue Date:
May-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/608487
DOI:
10.1002/hbm.23236
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/hbm.23236
Type:
Article
Description:
Accepted Date: 20/04/2016; Version: Author Manuscript / Post-Print; Exceptions: None
ISSN:
10659471
Sponsors:
This work was supported by the Department of Defense through the Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (G189AN and G189BK) and by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, at the National Institutes of Health.
Appears in Collections:
Department of Psychology Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorXu, Benjaminen
dc.contributor.authorSandrini, Marcoen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Wen-Tungen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Jason F.en
dc.contributor.authorSarlls, Joelle E.en
dc.contributor.authorAwosika, Oluwoleen
dc.contributor.authorButman, John A.en
dc.contributor.authorHorwitz, Barryen
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Leonardo G.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-06T14:03:04Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-06T14:03:04Zen
dc.date.issued2016-05en
dc.identifier.citationPreSMA stimulation changes task-free functional connectivity in the fronto-basal-ganglia that correlates with response inhibition efficiency 2016 Human Brain Mappingen
dc.identifier.issn10659471en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hbm.23236en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/608487en
dc.descriptionAccepted Date: 20/04/2016; Version: Author Manuscript / Post-Print; Exceptions: Noneen
dc.description.abstractPrevious work using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) demonstrated that the right presupplementary motor area (preSMA), a node in the fronto-basal-ganglia network, is critical for response inhibition. However, TMS influences interconnected regions, raising the possibility of a link between the preSMA activity and the functional connectivity within the network. To understand this relationship, we applied single-pulse TMS to the right preSMA during functional magnetic resonance imaging when the subjects were at rest to examine changes in neural activity and functional connectivity within the network in relation to the efficiency of response inhibition evaluated with a stop-signal task. The results showed that preSMA-TMS increased activation in the right inferior-frontal cortex (rIFC) and basal ganglia and modulated their task-free functional connectivity. Both the TMS-induced changes in the basal-ganglia activation and the functional connectivity between rIFC and left striatum, and of the overall network correlated with the efficiency of response inhibition and with the white-matter microstructure along the preSMA–rIFC pathway. These results suggest that the task-free functional and structural connectivity between the rIFCop and basal ganglia are critical to the efficiency of response inhibition.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Anne Pietsch (a.pietsch@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2016-05-06T14:02:33Z No. of bitstreams: 2 Xu et al 2016 PreSMA stimulation changes task-free functional connectivity in.pdf: 399547 bytes, checksum: 6db0ca3172693e5d7e361c1288524bff (MD5) Xu et al Supplementary Material_TMS-fMRI-pdf.pdf: 301377 bytes, checksum: 37918398edad5f63ddd2db59ecf55616 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Anne Pietsch (a.pietsch@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2016-05-06T14:03:02Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 Xu et al 2016 PreSMA stimulation changes task-free functional connectivity in.pdf: 399547 bytes, checksum: 6db0ca3172693e5d7e361c1288524bff (MD5) Xu et al Supplementary Material_TMS-fMRI-pdf.pdf: 301377 bytes, checksum: 37918398edad5f63ddd2db59ecf55616 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-06T14:03:04Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 Xu et al 2016 PreSMA stimulation changes task-free functional connectivity in.pdf: 399547 bytes, checksum: 6db0ca3172693e5d7e361c1288524bff (MD5) Xu et al Supplementary Material_TMS-fMRI-pdf.pdf: 301377 bytes, checksum: 37918398edad5f63ddd2db59ecf55616 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2016-05en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Department of Defense through the Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (G189AN and G189BK) and by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, at the National Institutes of Health.en
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/hbm.23236en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Human Brain Mappingen
dc.titlePreSMA stimulation changes task-free functional connectivity in the fronto-basal-ganglia that correlates with response inhibition efficiencyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHuman Cortical Physiology and Neurorehabilitation Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health; Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences; University of Maryland; Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health; NIH MRI Research Facility, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health; Section on Brain Imaging and Modeling, National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Healthen
dc.identifier.journalHuman Brain Mappingen
dc.contributor.institutionHuman Cortical Physiology and Neurorehabilitation Section; National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health; Bethesda Maryland 20892en
dc.contributor.institutionHuman Cortical Physiology and Neurorehabilitation Section; National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health; Bethesda Maryland 20892en
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine; Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences; Bethesda Maryland 20814en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology; University of Maryland College Park; Maryland 20742-4411en
dc.contributor.institutionNIH MRI Research Facility; National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Bethesda Maryland 20892en
dc.contributor.institutionHuman Cortical Physiology and Neurorehabilitation Section; National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health; Bethesda Maryland 20892en
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine; Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences; Bethesda Maryland 20814en
dc.contributor.institutionSection on Brain Imaging and Modeling; National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Bethesda Maryland 20892en
dc.contributor.institutionHuman Cortical Physiology and Neurorehabilitation Section; National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health; Bethesda Maryland 20892en
All Items in RURR are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.