Investigating primate tourism in Morocco using a multidisciplinary approach

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/596896
Title:
Investigating primate tourism in Morocco using a multidisciplinary approach
Authors:
Maréchal, Laëtitia
Abstract:
Wildlife tourism is a growing industry, with potential benefits for the conservation of endangered species. In this thesis, I explore wildlife tourism at a site in Morocco, using a multidisciplinary approach which considers both the attitudes and expectations of tourists, and the responses of, and impacts on, Barbary macaques. Different types of tourists, mostly Moroccan nationals, visited the site and frequently gave food to the macaques. The desire to feed the monkeys appeared to be driven by different motivations such as the reward from sharing food, the creation of a relationship or taking control over these animals. Such interactions therefore shape a particular tourist experience; this can lead in some cases to a degree of disappointment about the authenticity of the wildlife experience. Considering how the monkeys responded to tourists, I found evidence that they use a range of behavioural coping mechanisms to cope with the potentially conflicting motivational situations associated with the risks of interacting with tourists and the attraction of potential food. I propose a framework to aid understanding of how the trade-off between threat and attraction can lead to different coping mechanisms being deployed. Looking at potential effects of tourist provisioning on the health of the macaques, I found evidence for potential negative impacts in terms of increased risk of disease transmission, elevated stress levels and increased body size. The results also highlighted the key issue of not knowing what is optimum health in wild animals, making interpretation of the findings difficult. The multidisciplinary approach adopted in this thesis provided a useful tool to explore different aspects of primate tourism at the site from both tourist and animal standpoints. This approach led to the development of a new concept, optimal provisioning, which takes into consideration the different costs and benefits of provisioning wildlife to the various parties involved. It is hoped that this approach will prove useful in developing pragmatic solutions to the question of whether and how much provisioning may be acceptable in wildlife tourism contexts.
Advisors:
Semple, Stuart; MacLarnon, Ann; Marvin, Garry
Publisher:
Roehampton University
Issue Date:
4-Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/596896
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Sponsors:
This research was supported by a student bursary from the University of Roehampton. Additional research funds were provided by the University of Roehampton, the International Primatological Society, and Santander. I am extremely grateful for the financial support received by the different grant bodies cited above.
Appears in Collections:
PhD Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorSemple, Stuarten
dc.contributor.advisorMacLarnon, Annen
dc.contributor.advisorMarvin, Garryen
dc.contributor.authorMaréchal, Laëtitiaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-22T09:40:31Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-22T09:40:31Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08-04en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/596896en
dc.description.abstractWildlife tourism is a growing industry, with potential benefits for the conservation of endangered species. In this thesis, I explore wildlife tourism at a site in Morocco, using a multidisciplinary approach which considers both the attitudes and expectations of tourists, and the responses of, and impacts on, Barbary macaques. Different types of tourists, mostly Moroccan nationals, visited the site and frequently gave food to the macaques. The desire to feed the monkeys appeared to be driven by different motivations such as the reward from sharing food, the creation of a relationship or taking control over these animals. Such interactions therefore shape a particular tourist experience; this can lead in some cases to a degree of disappointment about the authenticity of the wildlife experience. Considering how the monkeys responded to tourists, I found evidence that they use a range of behavioural coping mechanisms to cope with the potentially conflicting motivational situations associated with the risks of interacting with tourists and the attraction of potential food. I propose a framework to aid understanding of how the trade-off between threat and attraction can lead to different coping mechanisms being deployed. Looking at potential effects of tourist provisioning on the health of the macaques, I found evidence for potential negative impacts in terms of increased risk of disease transmission, elevated stress levels and increased body size. The results also highlighted the key issue of not knowing what is optimum health in wild animals, making interpretation of the findings difficult. The multidisciplinary approach adopted in this thesis provided a useful tool to explore different aspects of primate tourism at the site from both tourist and animal standpoints. This approach led to the development of a new concept, optimal provisioning, which takes into consideration the different costs and benefits of provisioning wildlife to the various parties involved. It is hoped that this approach will prove useful in developing pragmatic solutions to the question of whether and how much provisioning may be acceptable in wildlife tourism contexts.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Laetitia Marechal (lmarechal@lincoln.ac.uk) on 2015-08-04T16:24:15Z No. of bitstreams: 3 Laetitia Marechal_PhD thesis 2015.pdf: 6747086 bytes, checksum: 622940c8b67828adfbd4419c001b6f4c (MD5) license_text: 21326 bytes, checksum: 3ece24ca8606da559a21ffc79b7a9f85 (MD5) license_rdf: 23148 bytes, checksum: 9da0b6dfac957114c6a7714714b86306 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Anne Pietsch (a.pietsch@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2016-02-22T09:40:28Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 3 Laetitia Marechal_PhD thesis 2015.pdf: 6747086 bytes, checksum: 622940c8b67828adfbd4419c001b6f4c (MD5) license_text: 21326 bytes, checksum: 3ece24ca8606da559a21ffc79b7a9f85 (MD5) license_rdf: 23148 bytes, checksum: 9da0b6dfac957114c6a7714714b86306 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-02-22T09:40:31Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 3 Laetitia Marechal_PhD thesis 2015.pdf: 6747086 bytes, checksum: 622940c8b67828adfbd4419c001b6f4c (MD5) license_text: 21326 bytes, checksum: 3ece24ca8606da559a21ffc79b7a9f85 (MD5) license_rdf: 23148 bytes, checksum: 9da0b6dfac957114c6a7714714b86306 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2015-08-04en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by a student bursary from the University of Roehampton. Additional research funds were provided by the University of Roehampton, the International Primatological Society, and Santander. I am extremely grateful for the financial support received by the different grant bodies cited above.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoehampton Universityen
dc.subjectprimatesen
dc.subjectTourismen
dc.subjectHuman-wildlife realtionshipsen
dc.titleInvestigating primate tourism in Morocco using a multidisciplinary approachen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.publisher.departmentDepartment of Life Sciencesen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
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