Coping collectively: the formation of a teacher self-help group

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/53254
Title:
Coping collectively: the formation of a teacher self-help group
Authors:
Troman, Geoff
Abstract:
Some social movements theorists argue that contemporary social movements such as pressure groups and support groups are increasingly fulfilling the protest function of political parties and trades unions in post-industrial societies. Furthermore, these social, cultural, emotional and economic developments are occurring on a global scale. This article is an ethnographic account of teachers in an English local education authority who formed a self-help group for what they perceived to be 'bullied' (i.e. abused in the workplace) local authority and private sector employees. This was a mode of collective rather than individual coping. The identity work involved in self-renewal for these workers was a collective, social and political process, involving networking with other similar individuals and groups nationally. I argue that, given the decline in trades union powers, the teachers can be considered to be reinventing collectivity and collective protest. And the self-help group studied is not fundamentally different in character to labour movements of the past.
Citation:
British Journal of Sociology of Education, Volume 24, Issue 2 April 2003 , pages 145 - 157
Publisher:
Routledge
Journal:
British Journal of Sociology of Education
Issue Date:
Apr-2003
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01425690301903
DOI:
10.1080/01425690301903
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0142-5692; 1465-3346
Appears in Collections:
Department of Education Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTroman, Geoff-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-09T13:19:47Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-09T13:19:47Z-
dc.date.issued2003-04-
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Sociology of Education, Volume 24, Issue 2 April 2003 , pages 145 - 157en
dc.identifier.issn0142-5692-
dc.identifier.issn1465-3346-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01425690301903-
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01425690301903-
dc.description.abstractSome social movements theorists argue that contemporary social movements such as pressure groups and support groups are increasingly fulfilling the protest function of political parties and trades unions in post-industrial societies. Furthermore, these social, cultural, emotional and economic developments are occurring on a global scale. This article is an ethnographic account of teachers in an English local education authority who formed a self-help group for what they perceived to be 'bullied' (i.e. abused in the workplace) local authority and private sector employees. This was a mode of collective rather than individual coping. The identity work involved in self-renewal for these workers was a collective, social and political process, involving networking with other similar individuals and groups nationally. I argue that, given the decline in trades union powers, the teachers can be considered to be reinventing collectivity and collective protest. And the self-help group studied is not fundamentally different in character to labour movements of the past.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.titleCoping collectively: the formation of a teacher self-help groupen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Sociology of Educationen
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