Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/40597
Title:
Is relevance theory asocial?
Authors:
Jary, Mark
Abstract:
This paper challenges the view that Sperber & Wilson's Relevance Theory is intrinsically asocial. To this effect, it is firstly shown how Relevance Theory provides a more satisfactory explanation of the 'politeness' of imperative sentences than Brown & Levinson's treatment. Secondly' supposed examples of the theory's inability to explain socially motivated instances of language use presented by O'Neill are examined and shown to be well within its explanatory power. Finally, a more general argument is presented. Recent insights from evolutionary psychology are drawn on in order to demonstrate how Sperber & Wilson's account of the way humans interpret utterances is able to accommodate a social dimension
Citation:
JARY, Mark. “Is relevance theory asocial?”. Revista alicantina de estudios ingleses. No. 11 (Nov. 1998). ISSN 0214-4808, pp. 157-169
Publisher:
Universidad de Alicante. Departamento de Filología Inglesa
Journal:
Revista alicantina de estudios ingleses
Issue Date:
1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/40597
Additional Links:
http://rua.ua.es/dspace/handle/10045/5372
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0214-4808
Appears in Collections:
Department of Media, Culture and Language Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJary, Mark-
dc.date.accessioned2008-11-10T17:07:57Z-
dc.date.available2008-11-10T17:07:57Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationJARY, Mark. “Is relevance theory asocial?”. Revista alicantina de estudios ingleses. No. 11 (Nov. 1998). ISSN 0214-4808, pp. 157-169en
dc.identifier.issn0214-4808-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/40597-
dc.description.abstractThis paper challenges the view that Sperber & Wilson's Relevance Theory is intrinsically asocial. To this effect, it is firstly shown how Relevance Theory provides a more satisfactory explanation of the 'politeness' of imperative sentences than Brown & Levinson's treatment. Secondly' supposed examples of the theory's inability to explain socially motivated instances of language use presented by O'Neill are examined and shown to be well within its explanatory power. Finally, a more general argument is presented. Recent insights from evolutionary psychology are drawn on in order to demonstrate how Sperber & Wilson's account of the way humans interpret utterances is able to accommodate a social dimensionen
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Pat Simons (p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2008-11-10T17:04:50Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2008-11-10T17:05:03Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2008-11-10T17:07:57Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2008-11-10T17:07:57Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 1998en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversidad de Alicante. Departamento de Filología Inglesaen
dc.relation.urlhttp://rua.ua.es/dspace/handle/10045/5372en
dc.subjectTeoría de la relevanciaen
dc.subjectCortesíaen
dc.subjectInteracción verbalen
dc.subjectLingüística cognitivaen
dc.subjectComportamiento socialen
dc.titleIs relevance theory asocial?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalRevista alicantina de estudios inglesesen
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