Identification of animal movement patterns using tri-axial accelerometry

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/40466
Title:
Identification of animal movement patterns using tri-axial accelerometry
Authors:
Shepard, E.L.C.; Halsey, Lewis G.
Abstract:
An animal’s behaviour is a response to its environment and physiological condition, and as such, gives vital clues as to its well-being, which is highly relevant in conservation issues. Behaviour can generally be typified by body motion and body posture, parameters that are both measurable using animal-attached accelerometers. Interpretation of acceleration data, however, can be complex, as the static (indicative of posture) and dynamic (motion) components are derived from the total acceleration values, which should ideally be recorded in all 3-dimensional axes. The principles of triaxial accelerometry are summarised and discussed in terms of the commonalities that arise in patterns of acceleration across species that vary in body pattern, life-history strategy, and the medium they inhabit. Using tri-axial acceleration data from deployments on captive and free-living animals (n = 12 species), behaviours were identified that varied in complexity, from the rhythmic patterns of locomotion, to feeding, and more variable patterns including those relating to social interactions. These data can be combined with positional information to qualify patterns of area-use and map the distribution of target behaviours. The range and distribution of behaviour may also provide insight into the transmission of disease. In this way, the measurement of tri-axial acceleration can provide insight into individual and population level processes, which may ultimately influence the effectiveness of conservation practice
Journal:
Endangered Species Research
Issue Date:
Mar-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/40466
DOI:
10.3354/esr00084
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
18635407; 16134796
Appears in Collections:
Department of Life Sciences Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShepard, E.L.C.-
dc.contributor.authorHalsey, Lewis G.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-11-07T09:30:53Z-
dc.date.available2008-11-07T09:30:53Z-
dc.date.issued2008-03-
dc.identifier.issn18635407-
dc.identifier.issn16134796-
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/esr00084-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/40466-
dc.description.abstractAn animal’s behaviour is a response to its environment and physiological condition, and as such, gives vital clues as to its well-being, which is highly relevant in conservation issues. Behaviour can generally be typified by body motion and body posture, parameters that are both measurable using animal-attached accelerometers. Interpretation of acceleration data, however, can be complex, as the static (indicative of posture) and dynamic (motion) components are derived from the total acceleration values, which should ideally be recorded in all 3-dimensional axes. The principles of triaxial accelerometry are summarised and discussed in terms of the commonalities that arise in patterns of acceleration across species that vary in body pattern, life-history strategy, and the medium they inhabit. Using tri-axial acceleration data from deployments on captive and free-living animals (n = 12 species), behaviours were identified that varied in complexity, from the rhythmic patterns of locomotion, to feeding, and more variable patterns including those relating to social interactions. These data can be combined with positional information to qualify patterns of area-use and map the distribution of target behaviours. The range and distribution of behaviour may also provide insight into the transmission of disease. In this way, the measurement of tri-axial acceleration can provide insight into individual and population level processes, which may ultimately influence the effectiveness of conservation practiceen
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Pat Simons (p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2008-11-07T08:50:48Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2008-11-07T09:30:53Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2008-11-07T09:30:53Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2008-03en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectaccelerationen
dc.subjectarchival tagen
dc.subjectsatellite trackingen
dc.subjectbiotelemetryen
dc.subjecttime budgeten
dc.subjectenergy expenditureen
dc.subjectstroke frequencyen
dc.titleIdentification of animal movement patterns using tri-axial accelerometryen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEndangered Species Researchen
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