Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/38941
Title:
Edge effects, tropical forests and invertebrates.
Authors:
Foggo, A.; Ozanne, Claire; Speight, Martin; Hambler, C.
Abstract:
The term edge effect can be used to encompass a wide range of both biotic and abiotic trends associated with boundaries between adjacent habitat types, whether these be natural or anthropogenic. Edge effects have been shown to represent significant forces affecting both faunal and floral assemblages in fragmented ecosystems. Specific studies of faunal assemblages associated with habitat edges have revealed trends at all levels of biological organisation from individuals to communities. Studies of edge effects on invertebrates in tropical forests have been relatively scarce. In this paper we review the nature and organisation of edge effects, focusing upon the processes which may lead to detrimental consequences for both forest canopy invertebrates and the forests themselves. We present as a case study data illustrating the very large amount of variance (over 50%) in community structure that is predicted simply by abiotic (microclimatic) variables in both a tropical and a temperate forest edge. We summarise major features of edge effects amongst forest invertebrates, stress the inter-relatedness of edge and canopy biology, and present an agenda for study of the canopy as an edge.
Journal:
Plant Ecology
Issue Date:
2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/38941
DOI:
10.1023/A:1017594108769
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
13850237; 15735052
Appears in Collections:
Department of Life Sciences Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFoggo, A.-
dc.contributor.authorOzanne, Claire-
dc.contributor.authorSpeight, Martin-
dc.contributor.authorHambler, C.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-13T13:19:43Z-
dc.date.available2008-10-13T13:19:43Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.issn13850237-
dc.identifier.issn15735052-
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1017594108769-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/38941-
dc.description.abstractThe term edge effect can be used to encompass a wide range of both biotic and abiotic trends associated with boundaries between adjacent habitat types, whether these be natural or anthropogenic. Edge effects have been shown to represent significant forces affecting both faunal and floral assemblages in fragmented ecosystems. Specific studies of faunal assemblages associated with habitat edges have revealed trends at all levels of biological organisation from individuals to communities. Studies of edge effects on invertebrates in tropical forests have been relatively scarce. In this paper we review the nature and organisation of edge effects, focusing upon the processes which may lead to detrimental consequences for both forest canopy invertebrates and the forests themselves. We present as a case study data illustrating the very large amount of variance (over 50%) in community structure that is predicted simply by abiotic (microclimatic) variables in both a tropical and a temperate forest edge. We summarise major features of edge effects amongst forest invertebrates, stress the inter-relatedness of edge and canopy biology, and present an agenda for study of the canopy as an edge.-
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Pat Simons (p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2008-10-13T13:13:43Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2008-10-13T13:19:43Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2008-10-13T13:19:43Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2001en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleEdge effects, tropical forests and invertebrates.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPlant Ecologyen
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