Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/36352
Title:
Listening to Shakespeare
Authors:
Greenhalgh, Susanne
Abstract:
Research into radio Shakespeare to date has been infrequent and remains under-developed. This essay outlines and compares the main features of Shakespeare-related sound broadcasting in Britain, America, Australia, and Canada from the 1920s to its absorption into the worldwide web at the start of the twenty first century. Hamlet is used as a case-study through which to illustrate the rich hidden history of radio performances, interpretations, rewritings and parodies. Adaptations of Shakespeare’s works were central to the public service responsibilities enforced on, or voluntarily embraced by, English-language radio, and these “highbrow” and often high profile programmes in turn helped maintain the audience recognition of Shakespearean references that made “lowbrow” cultural reinvention possible. Hamlet in particular has been drawn upon for countless allusions, plotlines and contexts, in a wide range of radio genres, such as features, psychological dramas, situation comedy, westerns, and suspense thrillers, as well as more experimental writing, which offered new readings of the play, or meditated on Shakespeare as a model or metaphor for the creative possibilities of the radio medium.
Citation:
McKernan, Luke, Olwen Terris and Eve-Marie Oesterlen eds. The Researcher's Guide to Shakespeare on Film, Television and Radio
Publisher:
Wallflower Press
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/36352
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9780901299766
Appears in Collections:
Department of Drama, Theatre and Performance Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGreenhalgh, Susanne-
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-26T07:16:30Z-
dc.date.available2008-08-26T07:16:30Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationMcKernan, Luke, Olwen Terris and Eve-Marie Oesterlen eds. The Researcher's Guide to Shakespeare on Film, Television and Radioen
dc.identifier.isbn9780901299766-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/36352-
dc.description.abstractResearch into radio Shakespeare to date has been infrequent and remains under-developed. This essay outlines and compares the main features of Shakespeare-related sound broadcasting in Britain, America, Australia, and Canada from the 1920s to its absorption into the worldwide web at the start of the twenty first century. Hamlet is used as a case-study through which to illustrate the rich hidden history of radio performances, interpretations, rewritings and parodies. Adaptations of Shakespeare’s works were central to the public service responsibilities enforced on, or voluntarily embraced by, English-language radio, and these “highbrow” and often high profile programmes in turn helped maintain the audience recognition of Shakespearean references that made “lowbrow” cultural reinvention possible. Hamlet in particular has been drawn upon for countless allusions, plotlines and contexts, in a wide range of radio genres, such as features, psychological dramas, situation comedy, westerns, and suspense thrillers, as well as more experimental writing, which offered new readings of the play, or meditated on Shakespeare as a model or metaphor for the creative possibilities of the radio medium.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Susanne Greenhalgh (s.greenhalgh@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2008-08-23T14:54:37Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Pat Simons(p.simons@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2008-08-26T07:16:29Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2008-08-26T07:16:30Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2008en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWallflower Pressen
dc.subjectShakespeare AND (radio OR broadcasting)en
dc.subjectHamlet AND (radio OR broadcasting)en
dc.titleListening to Shakespeareen
dc.typeBook chapteren
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