The assessment and treatment of intellectually disabled sexual offenders; the development and evaluation of the Becoming New Me treatment programme

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/323062
Title:
The assessment and treatment of intellectually disabled sexual offenders; the development and evaluation of the Becoming New Me treatment programme
Authors:
Williams, Fiona
Abstract:
Approximately 30% of offenders are intellectually disabled, yet little is known about effective treatment with this group. The aim of this thesis is to advance our understanding of intellectually disabled sexual offenders (IDSOs) through the development and evaluation of a treatment programme, Becoming New Me (BNM). The Risk, Need and Responsivity (RNR) model (Andrews et al., 1990) is the only empirically validated model of offender rehabilitation. Meta analytic studies have shown that the RNR principles apply to various offender populations, including sexual offenders, but no work has looked at their relevance to IDSOs. As such, the research question in this thesis is; can the RNR model be successfully applied to the treatment of IDSOs? The literature pertaining to each principle and its applicability to IDSOs is reviewed and the development of the BNM in line with the findings is described. In order to evaluate the success of the BNM approach, and thereby assess the utility of the RNR model, an outcome and a process evaluation were undertaken. The research involved 131 BNM programme completers and focus group discussions with 19 BNM participants and 20 therapists. In order to assess criminogenic needs, eight assessment measures were developed and found to have acceptable psychometric properties. Change was observed in the hypothesised direction on most of the measures irrespective of risk, IQ, age or offence type. Where change in the desired direction was not found, explanations are offered. The results of the process evaluation reveal that the treatment experience for BNM participants and therapists was generally positive. Further, this research provides new insights into the factors which are relevant to responsivity in the treatment of IDSOs. It is concluded that the RNR model is applicable to the treatment of IDSOs. Possible recommendations for practice and further research are identified but limitations are recognised.
Issue Date:
26-Mar-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/323062
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
PhD Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Fionaen
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-16T10:24:27Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-16T10:24:27Z-
dc.date.issued2013-03-26-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/323062-
dc.description.abstractApproximately 30% of offenders are intellectually disabled, yet little is known about effective treatment with this group. The aim of this thesis is to advance our understanding of intellectually disabled sexual offenders (IDSOs) through the development and evaluation of a treatment programme, Becoming New Me (BNM). The Risk, Need and Responsivity (RNR) model (Andrews et al., 1990) is the only empirically validated model of offender rehabilitation. Meta analytic studies have shown that the RNR principles apply to various offender populations, including sexual offenders, but no work has looked at their relevance to IDSOs. As such, the research question in this thesis is; can the RNR model be successfully applied to the treatment of IDSOs? The literature pertaining to each principle and its applicability to IDSOs is reviewed and the development of the BNM in line with the findings is described. In order to evaluate the success of the BNM approach, and thereby assess the utility of the RNR model, an outcome and a process evaluation were undertaken. The research involved 131 BNM programme completers and focus group discussions with 19 BNM participants and 20 therapists. In order to assess criminogenic needs, eight assessment measures were developed and found to have acceptable psychometric properties. Change was observed in the hypothesised direction on most of the measures irrespective of risk, IQ, age or offence type. Where change in the desired direction was not found, explanations are offered. The results of the process evaluation reveal that the treatment experience for BNM participants and therapists was generally positive. Further, this research provides new insights into the factors which are relevant to responsivity in the treatment of IDSOs. It is concluded that the RNR model is applicable to the treatment of IDSOs. Possible recommendations for practice and further research are identified but limitations are recognised.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Sarah-Louise Hall (sarah-louise.hall@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2014-07-16T10:23:54Z No. of bitstreams: 3 Fiona Williams Psych D final.pdf: 3403967 bytes, checksum: d05ae254999aac0debc1d7ca01af44f0 (MD5) license_text: 21936 bytes, checksum: 9833653f73f7853880c94a6fead477b1 (MD5) license_rdf: 23148 bytes, checksum: 9da0b6dfac957114c6a7714714b86306 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Sarah-Louise Hall (sarah-louise.hall@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2014-07-16T10:24:24Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 3 Fiona Williams Psych D final.pdf: 3403967 bytes, checksum: d05ae254999aac0debc1d7ca01af44f0 (MD5) license_text: 21936 bytes, checksum: 9833653f73f7853880c94a6fead477b1 (MD5) license_rdf: 23148 bytes, checksum: 9da0b6dfac957114c6a7714714b86306 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2014-07-16T10:24:27Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 3 Fiona Williams Psych D final.pdf: 3403967 bytes, checksum: d05ae254999aac0debc1d7ca01af44f0 (MD5) license_text: 21936 bytes, checksum: 9833653f73f7853880c94a6fead477b1 (MD5) license_rdf: 23148 bytes, checksum: 9da0b6dfac957114c6a7714714b86306 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-03-26en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleThe assessment and treatment of intellectually disabled sexual offenders; the development and evaluation of the Becoming New Me treatment programmeen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.type.qualificationnamePsychD Forensic Psychology-
dc.type.qualificationlevelPhD-
dc.subject.keywordPsychD Forensic Psychology-
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in RURR are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.