An exploratory study of the role of music with participants in children’s centres

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/321585
Title:
An exploratory study of the role of music with participants in children’s centres
Authors:
Pitt, Jessica
Abstract:
This three-phase, mixed-methods exploratory study explored parents’ and Children’s Centre practitioners’ attitudes towards and perceptions of the role of parent-child music activities in Children’s Centres in England. A socio-cultural theoretical framework was adopted which views children’s learning as socially and culturally situated: cognitive development is interlinked with social activity. A qualitative interview study (phase one) generated initial themes that were investigated further in a questionnaire study (phase two) so as to establish a rationale for music groups in Children’s Centres from the perspectives of parents and practitioners. The themes to emerge were: social, emotional, learning, teaching, parenting, musical, links to home, and organisational. Differences were found between parents and professionals through analysis of the questionnaire study data. Although both groups were very positive overall in their attitudes to music, practitioners were more positive about the perceived benefits to parents than parents reported themselves, and were slightly more positive overall about the benefits of music for children. Parents perceived the emotional benefits for children as most important, and practitioners the learning benefits: both groups perceived the social benefits for children as being of secondary importance. Phase three was a behavioural observation study that compared a parentchild music group with a similar art and outdoor-play group, and found that the music group worked in a way which was distinct from those of the other two groups. This research led to the proposal of a ‘musical-social-learning model’ which describes the social, cultural, emotional and cognitive learning environment that musical activities afford, in which parent-child pairs co-participate in the musical activities through synchronised use of symbolic actions. This leads to a group symmetry of interaction and shared emotional experiences that may reinforce learning, self-assessment and contribute to positive feelings in the participants.
Publisher:
Roehampton University
Issue Date:
Feb-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/321585
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
PhD Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPitt, Jessicaen
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-13T14:23:54Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-13T14:23:54Z-
dc.date.issued2014-02-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/321585-
dc.description.abstractThis three-phase, mixed-methods exploratory study explored parents’ and Children’s Centre practitioners’ attitudes towards and perceptions of the role of parent-child music activities in Children’s Centres in England. A socio-cultural theoretical framework was adopted which views children’s learning as socially and culturally situated: cognitive development is interlinked with social activity. A qualitative interview study (phase one) generated initial themes that were investigated further in a questionnaire study (phase two) so as to establish a rationale for music groups in Children’s Centres from the perspectives of parents and practitioners. The themes to emerge were: social, emotional, learning, teaching, parenting, musical, links to home, and organisational. Differences were found between parents and professionals through analysis of the questionnaire study data. Although both groups were very positive overall in their attitudes to music, practitioners were more positive about the perceived benefits to parents than parents reported themselves, and were slightly more positive overall about the benefits of music for children. Parents perceived the emotional benefits for children as most important, and practitioners the learning benefits: both groups perceived the social benefits for children as being of secondary importance. Phase three was a behavioural observation study that compared a parentchild music group with a similar art and outdoor-play group, and found that the music group worked in a way which was distinct from those of the other two groups. This research led to the proposal of a ‘musical-social-learning model’ which describes the social, cultural, emotional and cognitive learning environment that musical activities afford, in which parent-child pairs co-participate in the musical activities through synchronised use of symbolic actions. This leads to a group symmetry of interaction and shared emotional experiences that may reinforce learning, self-assessment and contribute to positive feelings in the participants.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Sarah-Louise Hall (sarah-louise.hall@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2014-06-13T14:23:35Z No. of bitstreams: 3 Pitt Jessica.pdf: 4222493 bytes, checksum: f3b0c2b34db74ddf980b39601c7e4b76 (MD5) license_text: 21753 bytes, checksum: 33cf0001a25ca1ed06c2f13d62a9011b (MD5) license_rdf: 23148 bytes, checksum: 9da0b6dfac957114c6a7714714b86306 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Sarah-Louise Hall (sarah-louise.hall@roehampton.ac.uk) on 2014-06-13T14:23:51Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 3 Pitt Jessica.pdf: 4222493 bytes, checksum: f3b0c2b34db74ddf980b39601c7e4b76 (MD5) license_text: 21753 bytes, checksum: 33cf0001a25ca1ed06c2f13d62a9011b (MD5) license_rdf: 23148 bytes, checksum: 9da0b6dfac957114c6a7714714b86306 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2014-06-13T14:23:54Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 3 Pitt Jessica.pdf: 4222493 bytes, checksum: f3b0c2b34db74ddf980b39601c7e4b76 (MD5) license_text: 21753 bytes, checksum: 33cf0001a25ca1ed06c2f13d62a9011b (MD5) license_rdf: 23148 bytes, checksum: 9da0b6dfac957114c6a7714714b86306 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2014-02en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoehampton Universityen
dc.titleAn exploratory study of the role of music with participants in children’s centresen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
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