School choice and the commodification of education: a visual approach to school brochures and websites

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/197809
Title:
School choice and the commodification of education: a visual approach to school brochures and websites
Authors:
Wilkins, Andrew
Abstract:
As subjects of the parental right to choose (DES, 1988), parents are called upon to fulfil certain duties and responsibilities when choosing a secondary school for their child, with the expectation that they might navigate the school system ‘successfully’ and become ‘better informed consumers’ (DCSF, 2008). To comply with these rules of citizenship parents are encouraged to make use of a variety of information on schools as part of a realistic and informed choice, one that is consummate with their role as consumer-citizens. Such ‘cognitive mapping’ is evident in school brochures and websites where choice is assembled on the basis of visual iconography and narrative terrains. This leads to a consideration of how choice is visually mediated and communicated through the circulation of symbols and the structure of narratives. To explain these phenomena, I analyse and compare the ways in which two all-girls faith secondary schools attempt to (further) define themselves, culturally, historically and pedagogically, in a crowded field of choice. I conclude the paper with a discussion of the benefits and insights generated through a visually orientated approach to the study of school choice.
Citation:
School choice and the commodification of education: a visual approach to school brochures and websites 2011 Critical Social Policy
Publisher:
Sage
Journal:
Critical Social Policy
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0261018311425199
DOI:
10.1177/0261018311425199
Additional Links:
http://csp.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/0261018311425199
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0261-0183; 1461-703X
Appears in Collections:
Department of Education Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilkins, Andrewen
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-19T11:25:11Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-19T11:25:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationSchool choice and the commodification of education: a visual approach to school brochures and websites 2011 Critical Social Policyen
dc.identifier.issn0261-0183-
dc.identifier.issn1461-703X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0261018311425199-
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0261018311425199-
dc.description.abstractAs subjects of the parental right to choose (DES, 1988), parents are called upon to fulfil certain duties and responsibilities when choosing a secondary school for their child, with the expectation that they might navigate the school system ‘successfully’ and become ‘better informed consumers’ (DCSF, 2008). To comply with these rules of citizenship parents are encouraged to make use of a variety of information on schools as part of a realistic and informed choice, one that is consummate with their role as consumer-citizens. Such ‘cognitive mapping’ is evident in school brochures and websites where choice is assembled on the basis of visual iconography and narrative terrains. This leads to a consideration of how choice is visually mediated and communicated through the circulation of symbols and the structure of narratives. To explain these phenomena, I analyse and compare the ways in which two all-girls faith secondary schools attempt to (further) define themselves, culturally, historically and pedagogically, in a crowded field of choice. I conclude the paper with a discussion of the benefits and insights generated through a visually orientated approach to the study of school choice.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://csp.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/0261018311425199en
dc.subjectneoliberalismen
dc.subjectpolicy discourseen
dc.titleSchool choice and the commodification of education: a visual approach to school brochures and websitesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCritical Social Policyen
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