Ethical issues raised in researching an educational response to deliberate self-harm in adolescence

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/12450
Title:
Ethical issues raised in researching an educational response to deliberate self-harm in adolescence
Authors:
Best, Ron
Abstract:
Each year in the United Kingdom, some 25,000 young people are admitted to the accident and emergency departments of UK hospitals following episodes of deliberate self-harm (DSH). While social workers, psychiatrists and others operating in child and adolescent mental health services, secure units for young offenders and counselling services frequently encounter such behaviour, it is less-often experienced and recognized in schools. Recent media publicity has raised public awareness and there is evidence that teachers and others working in schools are becoming concerned about self-harm and how they should respond to it. This paper is in three sections: The first section outlines what is known and theorized about the nature, aetiology and incidence of DSH with reference to the psychological and cultural context in which it occurs. The second section summarises a small, exploratory study of awareness and response to DSH undertaken in 2003/4 and drawing on data from interviews with 34 teachers and other professionals dealing with DSH in educational settings. The ways in which schools might better respond to, and support young people who self-harm are also briefly considered. The third (and main) section discusses the ethical issues that are raised for teachers, counsellors and others who cope with DSH in supportive roles, and for those who attempt to undertake research in this area. Particular attention is given to issues of confidentiality, informed consent, boundaries, and implications for the health and safety of the researcher
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10142/12450
Submitted date:
2007-06-28
Type:
Other
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Department of Education Collection

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBest, Ron-
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-28T14:45:45Z-
dc.date.available2007-06-28T14:45:45Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.date.submitted2007-06-28-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10142/12450-
dc.description.abstractEach year in the United Kingdom, some 25,000 young people are admitted to the accident and emergency departments of UK hospitals following episodes of deliberate self-harm (DSH). While social workers, psychiatrists and others operating in child and adolescent mental health services, secure units for young offenders and counselling services frequently encounter such behaviour, it is less-often experienced and recognized in schools. Recent media publicity has raised public awareness and there is evidence that teachers and others working in schools are becoming concerned about self-harm and how they should respond to it. This paper is in three sections: The first section outlines what is known and theorized about the nature, aetiology and incidence of DSH with reference to the psychological and cultural context in which it occurs. The second section summarises a small, exploratory study of awareness and response to DSH undertaken in 2003/4 and drawing on data from interviews with 34 teachers and other professionals dealing with DSH in educational settings. The ways in which schools might better respond to, and support young people who self-harm are also briefly considered. The third (and main) section discusses the ethical issues that are raised for teachers, counsellors and others who cope with DSH in supportive roles, and for those who attempt to undertake research in this area. Particular attention is given to issues of confidentiality, informed consent, boundaries, and implications for the health and safety of the researcheren
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dc.format.extent-1 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectself-harmen
dc.subjectadolescenceen
dc.subjecteducationen
dc.subjectethicsen
dc.titleEthical issues raised in researching an educational response to deliberate self-harm in adolescenceen
dc.typeOtheren
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.nameAnnual Conference of the British Educational Research Association-
dc.conference.locationWarwick, UK-
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